Archive for January, 2009

Treatment of Tennis Elbow

Thursday, January 29th, 2009

Tennis elbow is a soft tissue injury of the muscles and tendons around the elbow joint, and therefore should be treated like any other soft tissue injury. Immediately following an injury, or at the onset of pain, the R.I.C.E.R. regime should be employed. This involves Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation, and Referral to an appropriate professional for an accurate diagnosis.

It is critical that the R.I.C.E.R. regime be implemented for at least the first 48 to 72 hours. Doing this will give you the best possible chance of a complete and full recovery.

The next phase of treatment (after the first 48 to 72 hours) involves a number of physiotherapy techniques. The application of heat and massage is one of the most effective treatments for removing scar tissue and speeding up the healing process of the muscles and tendons.

Once most of the pain has been reduced, it is time to move onto the rehabilitation phase of your treatment. The main aim of this phase it to regain the strength, power, endurance and flexibility of the muscle and tendons that have been injured.

Source

Signs and Symptoms of tennis Elbow

Tuesday, January 20th, 2009
  • Pain about 1-2 cm down from bony area at the outside of the elbow (lateral epicondyle)
  • Weakness in the wrist with difficulty doing simple tasks such as opening a door handle or shaking hands with someone.
  • Pain on the outside of the elbow when the hand is bent back (extended) at the wrist against resistance.
  • Pain on the outside of the elbow when trying to straighten the fingers against resistance.
  • Pain when pressing (palpating) just below the lateral epicondyle on the outside of the elbow..

Other injuries and conditions with similar symptoms :

  • The symptoms for this injury are very similar to Entrapment of the radial nerve which we recommend you also have a look at.
  • It is important to have the neck examined as well as elbow pain can be referred from problems in this region. See the neck pain page for further details.

Causes of Tennis Elbow

Friday, January 9th, 2009

Overuse of the forearm muscles using a repeated twisting motion is the most common cause of tennis elbow. These movements are common to various occupations such as carpentry or plumbing, and many daily activities such as yard work and lifting objects. Racquet sports, swimming, and throwing sports (such as baseball) can also lead to tennis elbow.

Tennis elbow injuries can result from:

Overuse. Repeated movements that involve twisting of the elbow cause small tears in the tendon, weakening it. Overuse depends on how hard or how long you do something.
A single accident, such as a direct hit to the side of the elbow (lateral epicondyle), or falling on an outstretched arm.
In sports, tennis elbow can also result from using the wrong type of equipment or improper technique. For example, a tennis racquet with a grip too large or small for your hand can put a lot of pressure on your tendon. Using a backhand swing where your elbow is ahead of the rest of your arm can also lead to tendon damage.

source : yahoo.com

What is Tennis Elbow

Tuesday, January 6th, 2009

tennis_elbow.jpg

“Tennis elbow” is a common term for a condition caused by overuse of arm and forearm muscles that results in elbow pain. You don’t have to play tennis to get this, but the term came into use because it can be a significant problem for some tennis players.Tennis elbow is caused by either abrupt or subtle injury of the muscle and tendon area around the outside of the elbow. Tennis elbow specifically involves the area where the muscles and tendons of the forearm attach to the outside bony area (called the epicondyle) of the elbow. Your doctor may call this condition lateral epicondylitis. Another common term, “golfer’s elbow,” refers to the same process occurring on the inside of the elbow — what your doctor may call medial epicondylitis. Overuse injury can also affect the back or posterior part of the elbow as well.

source : webmd.com