Natural Remedies for Asthma

Symptoms and Signs of Asthma
Asthma symptoms can range from mild, such as wheezing, to chronic coughing and wheezing during severe asthma attacks. These are some of the warning signs and symptoms:
1. Wheezing and shortness of breath.
2. Difficulty sleeping due to shortness of breath, wheezing, and coughing.
3. Chest pain or tightness.
4. Shortness of breath during exercise.
5. Increased need for bronchodilators (medications that open airways by relaxing the surrounding muscles).

Remedies for Asthma

If you are experiencing symptoms of asthma, it’s important to see your doctor to be properly diagnosed. Although alternative therapies haven’t been shown to be as promising for asthma as they have for other conditions, here are eight of the more popular alternative remedies for asthma.

1) Buteyko Breathing Technique
The Buteyko (pronounced bew-tay-ko) Breathing Technique was developed by Russian-born researcher Konstantin Pavlovich Buteyko. It consists of shallow-breathing exercises designed to help people with asthma breathe easier.

The Buteyko Breathing Technique is based on the premise that raising blood levels of carbon dioxide through shallow breathing can help people with asthma. Carbon dioxide is believed to dilate the smooth muscles of the airways.

A study involving 60 people with asthma compared the effects of the Buteyko Breathing Technique, a device that mimics pranayama (a yoga breathing technique), and a placebo. Researchers found people using the Buteyko Breathing Technique had a reduction in asthma symptoms. Symptoms didn’t change in the pranayama and the placebo groups.

The use of inhalers was reduced in the Buteyko group by two puffs a day at six months, but there was no change in the other two groups.

There have been several other promising clinical trials evaluating this technique, however, they have been small in size and may have had other problems with the study design. Critics of the technique say that the technique is expensive, that it makes no difference in the amount of carbon dioxide in the blood, that higher levels of carbon dioxide is not an effective strategy, and that any effects of the technique may be due to general relaxation.

Consult your doctor before starting any new therapy for asthma.

2) Omega Fatty Acids
One of the primary inflammation-causing fats in our diets is believed to be arachidonic acid. Arachidonic acid is found in certain foods, such as egg yolks, shellfish, and meat. Eating less of these foods is thought to decrease inflammation and asthma symptoms.

A German study examined data from 524 children and found that asthma was more prevalent in children with high levels of arachidonic acid.

Arachidonic acid can also be produced in our bodies. Another strategy to reduce levels of arachidonic acid is to increase intake of beneficial fats such as EPA (eicosapentanoic acid) from fish oil, and GLA (gamma-linolenic acid) from borage or evening primrose oil.

Omega-3 fatty acid capsules are sold in drug stores, health food stores and online. Look for the active ingredients EPA and DHA on the label.

Omega-3 fatty acid capsules may interact with blood-thinning drugs such as warfarin (Coumadin) and aspirin. Side effects may include indigestion and bleeding. To reduce a fishy aftertaste after taking fish oil capsules, they should be taken just before meals.



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