Archive for May, 2014

Three tips to Remove Whiteheads

Tuesday, May 27th, 2014

1. Drink lots of water and fresh juices.

2. Eat fresh fruits and vegetables.

3. First thing in the morning - Have a glass of warm water with the juice of lemon. It helps in detoxifying the body.

 

Best tips for your better feet

Friday, May 23rd, 2014

1. Wash your feet daily. Rinse off all soap and dry thoroughly, especially between toes.

2. Trim nails straight across, and not too short. Don’t cut out or dig at corners.

3. Do not trim, shave, or use over-the-counter medicines to dissolve corns or calluses

4. Wear clean socks or stockings, changed daily. Don’t wear any that are too short or too tight.

5. Wear shoes that fit.

6. Some people’s feet sweat more than others, and are more prone to athlete’s foot. These tips may help:

7. Wear shoes made of leather or canvas – not synthetics. Sandals are good.

8. Switch shoes from day to day.

9. Use foot powder.

10. See your doctor if severe problems persist.

Remedies for toot decay, cavity

Wednesday, May 14th, 2014

Dental cavities are holes in teeth caused by tooth decay. Cavities are also referred to as caries. Two main factors contribute to tooth decay — bacteria and a diet high in sugar and starch. There are over 500 different types of bacteria that are normally present in the mouth. These bacteria combine with food and saliva to form a sticky substance called plaque that attaches to teeth. Foods rich in starches add to the stickiness of the plaque, which begins to get hard if it remains on the teeth after a couple of days and turns into tartar or calculus. Bacteria in the plaque convert sugar into acid that dissolves the tooth structure causing holes, or cavities. Because of these two contributing factors, dental caries have been described as a “dietobacterial” disease The parts of teeth that are most vulnerable to tooth decay are areas where plaque can accumulate most easily. Plaque tends to settle into the pits and fissures in the tops of teeth, into the areas in between the teeth, and next to the gum line. Where there is plaque, there are bacteria and acid, and eventually destruction of the tooth surface. The cavity starts in the outer layer of the tooth (enamel) and as it gets deeper, penetrates into the softer inner layer of the tooth (dentin.) Typically, it isn’t until the decay reaches the dentin that a person will start to notice signs and symptoms of the cavity. Saliva helps prevent plaque from attaching to teeth and helps wash away and digest food particles. A low salivary flow or dry mouth leaves the teeth more vulnerable to tooth decay. Genetic factors that affect tooth decay are tooth size and shape, thickness of enamel, tooth position, tooth eruption time and sequence, and the bite.
Prevention — A greater emphasis on preventive dentistry has helped reduce the incidence of premature tooth loss. Since we can’t eliminate the bacteria that are in the mouth, limiting the amount and frequency of sugars and starches in our diet is the easiest way to prevent dental caries. Maintaining a healthy diet to prevent tooth decay is very important inchildren and toddlers both for baby teeth and as they start to get their adult teeth. Sugary soft drinks and juices are especially harmful to the teeth. When possible, sweeteners such as sucralose should be substituted for sucrose because they can’t be digested by bacteria. Xylitol is another sugar substitute that actually kills bacteria, so chewing xylitol gum after meals will greatly reduce the incidence of cavities. Plaque can be removed from the outside of teeth by brushing and from in between the teeth with dental floss. Use of a mouthwash also helps by limiting the number of harmful bacteria in the mouth. A dentist will often suggest placing plastic sealants in the pits and grooves of teeth in children to protect them from decay. Visiting the dentist regularly will help prevent cavities from forming, or catch them when they’re small.

How Alcohol Travels Through the Body

Friday, May 2nd, 2014


Alcohol is metabolized extremely quickly by the body.  Unlike foods, which require time for digestion, alcohol needs no digestion and is quickly absorbed.   Alcohol gets “VIP” treatment in the body – absorbing and metabolizing before most other nutrients.  About 20 percent is absorbed directly across the walls of an empty stomach and can reach the brain within one minute.

Once alcohol reaches the stomach, it begins to break down with the alcohol dehydrogenase enzyme.  This process reduces the amount of alcohol entering the blood by approximately 20%.  (Women produce less of this enzyme, which may help to partially explain why women become more intoxicated on less alcohol than men.). In addition, about 10% of the alcohol is expelled in the breath and urine.

Alcohol is rapidly absorbed in the upper portion of the small intestine. The alcohol-laden blood then travels to the liver via the veins and capillaries of the digestive tract, which affects nearly every liver cell.  The liver cells are the only cells in our body that can produce enough of the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase to oxidize alcohol at an appreciable rate.

Though alcohol affects every organ of the body, it’s most dramatic impact is upon the liver.  The liver cells normally prefer fatty acids as fuel, and package excess fatty acids as triglycerides, which they then route to other tissues of the body.  However, when alcohol is present, the liver cells are forced to first metabolize the alcohol, letting the fatty acids accumulate, sometimes in huge amounts.  Alcohol metabolism permanently changes liver cell structure, which impairs the liver’s ability to metabolize fats.  This explains why heavy drinkers tend to develop fatty livers.

The liver is able to metabolize about ½ ounce of ethanol per hour (approximately one drink, depending on a person’s body size, food intake, etc.).  If more alcohol arrives in the liver than the enzymes can handle, the excess alcohol travels to all parts of the body, circulating until the liver enzymes are finally able to process it. (Which is another good reason not to consume more than one drink per hour.).