Diarrhea and its quick treatment

Diarrhea is an increase in the frequency of bowel movements or a decrease in the form of stool (greater looseness of stool).
Diarrhea can be defined in absolute or relative terms based on either the frequency of bowel movements or the consistency (looseness) of stools.
With diarrhea, stools usually are looser whether or not the frequency of bowel movements is increased. This looseness of stool–which can vary all the way from slightly soft to watery–is caused by increased water in the stool. During normal digestion, food is kept liquid by the secretion of large amounts of water by the stomach, upper small intestine, pancreas, and gallbladder.
Acute diarrhea lasts from a few days up to a week.
Chronic diarrhea can be defined in several ways but almost always lasts more than three weeks.
Absorbents are compounds that absorb water. Absorbents that are taken orally bind water in the small intestine and colon and make diarrheal stools less watery. They also may bind toxic chemicals produced by bacteria that cause the small intestine to secrete fluid; however, the importance of toxin binding in reducing diarrhea is unclear. The two main absorbents are attapulgite and polycarbophil, and they are both available without prescriptions.



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