Fleabites bite

What do fleabites look like?

Fleabites are pretty distinctive. They remain small, unlike mosquito bites. If a flea bites you, you may see one or more of the following:

  • bites that appear as small, red bumps
  • a red “halo” around the bite center
  • bites in groups of three or four, or in a straight line
  • bites that appear around the ankles or legs

Fleabites are also common around the waist, armpits, breasts, groin, or in the folds of the elbows and knees.

What are the symptoms of a fleabite?

Fleabites exhibit several common symptoms. They are very itchy, and the skin around each bite may become sore or painful. And you may experience hives or develop a rash near the site of a bite.

Additionally, excessive scratching can further damage the skin and a secondary bacterial infection can develop.

Avoid scratching if you can, and monitor your bite areas for signs of an infection, including white-topped blisters or a rash.

Can fleabites cause other problems?

For humans, the risk of contracting another disease from the flea is very, very small. That’s not true for your pets, however.

It’s important to take them to a vet if they have fleas.

How are fleabites treated?

Fleabites will go away without treatment. However, in order to stop being bitten you have to stop the fleas.

Your pet and your home will need to be treated with pesticides to kill the fleas. Professional pest control experts should administer these treatments.

In most cases, you will need to leave your home for several hours after the treatment has been deployed.

Do-it-yourself home treatments are available for fleas, but if they do not work, you may need to seek professional help.

To relieve the symptoms of fleabites, try over-the-counter anti-itch creams and antihistamine medications.

Avoid scratching the area. If you notice signs of an infection at the bite site, such as a white pocket or rash, make an appointment to see your doctor.



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