Archive for the ‘Allergies’ Category

Can you get a fever with allergies?

Wednesday, May 25th, 2016

Hay fever is the old term for allergies ”because you get symptoms of a cold with a low grade fever. The average person does not know whether their sickness is viral, bacterial or the result of an allergen. “Allergy sufferers should consider using antihistamines at night (Benadryl).

What is the difference between allergic rhinitis and sinusitis?

Tuesday, May 24th, 2016

Allergic RhinitisSinusitis, and Rhinosinusitis. Inflammation of the nasal mucous membrane is called rhinitis. The symptoms include sneezing and runny and/or itchy nose, caused by irritation and congestion in the nose. There are two types: allergicrhinitis and non-allergic rhinitis.

Allergic Rhinitis

Monday, May 23rd, 2016

What Is Allergic Rhinitis?

An allergen is a typically harmless substance that causes an allergic reaction. Allergic rhinitis, commonly known as hay fever, is an allergic response to specific allergens. Some typical allergens are grass, dust, and mold. Pollen is the most common allergen.

Your body releases histamine when it encounters an allergen. A histamine is a natural chemical that defends your body from the allergen. This chemical causes allergic rhinitis, which can have many uncomfortable symptoms such as a runny nose, sneezing, and itchy eyes.

Seek treatment if you have this condition. It can interfere with your quality of life.

Types of Allergens

Common causes of allergic rhinitis include:

  • pollen
  • dust
  • animal dander (old skin)
  • cat saliva
  • mold

Pollen is the biggest culprit, especially during certain times of the year. Tree and Flower pollens are more prevalent in the spring, while grasses and weeds produce more pollen in the summer and fall months.

Risk Factors for Allergic Rhinitis

Allergies can happen to anyone, but you’re more likely to develop allergic rhinitis if your family has a history of allergies.

There are also external factors that can trigger this condition or make it worse. These include:

  • cigarette smoke
  • chemicals
  • cold temperatures
  • humidity
  • wind
  • air pollution
  • hairspray
  • perfumes and colognes
  • wood smoke
  • fumes

Symptoms of Allergic Rhinitis

The most common symptoms of this condition include:

  • sneezing
  • runny nose
  • stuffy nose
  • itchy nose
  • coughing
  • sore or scratchy throat
  • itchy and watery eyes
  • dark under-eye circles
  • frequent headaches
  • eczema-type symptoms, such as having extremely dry, itchy skin that often blisters
  • hives, which are red, sometimes itchy, bumps on the skin
  • excessive fatigue

Diagnosis of Allergic Rhinitis

People with minor allergies usually only need a physical exam. However, your doctor may recommend specific tests to help determine the best treatment and preventive measures.

A skin prick test is one of the most commonly used tests. During this test, your doctor places a variety of substances onto your skin to see how your body reacts to each one. Usually, a small red bump appears if you’re allergic to a substance.

Another common allergy test is a blood test, sometimes referred to as a radioallergosorbent test (RAST). The RAST measures the amount of immunoglobin E (IgE) antibodies to particular allergens that are present in your blood.

Allergic rhinitis can be either seasonal or perennial, which means they last all year.

Allergic Rhinitis Treatment

There are different ways to treat allergic rhinitis.

Antihistamines

Antihistamines effectively treat allergies. They can also help prevent this condition because they block histamine formation in the body. Some over-the-counter versions may be helpful, but remember to always talk to your doctor before starting a new medication, especially if you take other medications or have other medical conditions.

Decongestants

You can use decongestants over a short period of time to help relieve stuffy nose and sinus pressure. Ask your doctor before use if you have high blood pressure or genitourinary disease, such as an enlarged prostate.

Eye Drops and Nasal Sprays

You can temporarily use eye drops and nasal sprays to relieve itchiness and other symptoms related to allergies. However, don’t use either product on a long-term basis.

Immunotherapy

Your doctor may recommend immunotherapy if you have severe allergies. This treatment is commonly known as allergy shots. You can use this treatment plan in conjunction with medications to control your symptoms. These shots decrease your immune response to particular allergens over time.

10 common foods that can cause allergies in children

Saturday, July 11th, 2015

Food allergies in children are nightmares for every parent. The symptoms are not always the obvious — skin rashes and itching. In fact, they manifest in many ways than one and are different for each food.

1. Wheat

Allergy to wheat is common among children and happens due to gluten, a protein component found in it. However, only 10 percent of gluten intolerances are genetic. Most of the other cases they are usually due to a bout of major illness or reaction to medications and surgeries. Apart from wheat, barley, rye and oats also contain gluten that could lead to the same allergy.

Symptoms to watch out for

  • Watery diarrhoea
  • Indigestion that could lead to nausea, headache, excessive burping, etc.
  • Stomach aches, due swelling of the intestinal wall

2. Soya bean

Although, not as common as wheat allergy, soya is not compatible in some children with a sensitive digestive system. Known as a potent food that leads to hormonal imbalances, it isn’t easy to digest for some kids.

Symptoms to watch out for

  • Swelling on the hand and feet, tongue and lips
  • Puffed eyes
  • Flatulence and bloating

3. Milk

Allergy to milk, known as lactose intolerance, affects almost sixty percent of individuals all over the globe, at some point in life. Lactose intolerance is either primary or secondary. In the case of primary lactose intolerance, one is unable to tolerate milk or milk products. Whereas, those with secondary lactose intolerance can digest milk products like yoghurt, cheese, cottage cheese, etc.

Symptoms to watch out for

  • Bloating
  • Heaviness in the stomach
  • Flatulence
  • Diarrhoea
  • Vomiting

4. Carotene rich foods

Carrots, cantaloupe, mangoes, sweet potatoes, pumpkin, papayas are some common foods that are rich in carotene. Intolerance to carotene usually occurs in phases and might not be there for a lifetime. Rarely, it also happens when a child undergoes a treatment with potent antibiotics or steroids.

Symptoms to watch out for

  • Greenish stools
  • Vomiting
  • Yellow coloration of the skin

5. Shellfish

For seafood lovers, this could be bad news. Of the other fishes, this fish is known to be notorious with kids.  Symptoms to watch out for:

  • Hoarseness of the throat
  • Wheezing and coughing
  • Vomiting and nausea
  • Pale skin
  • Dizziness

6. Eggs

Some children are allergic to this protein rich food and can’t take it a bit. While others might be allergic to either egg white or the yolk.

Symptoms to watch out for

  • Skin reactions like red patches or rashes all over the body
  • Stomach aches
  • Wheezing or shortness of breath

7. Berries

A rich source of antioxidants, vitamins and minerals berries could also be an allergen to some children. Many kids are usually allergic to strawberries and blueberries.

Symptoms to watch for

  • Itchy skin
  • Redness of hands and feet
  • Rashes or hives
  • Burning sensation in the mouth

8. Nuts

Peanut allergies are  very common. However, other tree nuts like almonds, walnuts, hazelnuts, cashews, pistachio are equally to be blamed.

Symptoms to watch for

  • Mild swelling of tongue, lips and eyes
  • Nausea

9. Citrus fruits

Juicy sour and rich with so many health benefits citrus foods can make some children go sick and ailing.

Symptoms to watch out for

  • Scratchy, itchy throat
  • Swelling in the feet

10. Chillies

Children usually can’t tolerate spicy foods, but that doesn’t indicate an allergy. Introduce chillies to your child from the age of two to allow the taste buds to develop optimally.   However, they are usually allergic to dried chilli used to season a variety of dals and curries in India.

Symptoms to watch out for

  • Refusing foods, even ice-creams due to itchiness in the tongue
  • Runny nose
  • Watery eyes
  • Sore throat

Cotton Allergy

Friday, May 29th, 2015

Certain plants of the genus Gossypium have soft fibers that cling to the seeds. When harvested and processed, they make a fine textile called cotton. This fabric has clothed millions of people and has furnished blankets and pillowcases for the comfort of sleepers. However, it causes discomfort to individuals who are allergic to cotton.

 

Cotton Flower Receptacle

Some people are allergic to cotton plant tissues. The flowers of the cotton plant rest on a structure called a receptacle. Tissue extracted from cotton plant receptacles provokes the production of antibodies in some individuals, according to the “British Journal of Industrial Medicine.” Antibodies protect against diseases, but they may also provoke allergic reactions.

Cotton Fibers

Some people are allergic to cotton fibers. These fibers grow on cotton seeds inside the cotton boll, or the fruit of the cotton plant. They sometimes produce positive responses in skin tests for allergens. They also cause the production of antibodies.

 

Cotton Factory Workers.

Some of the allergens in cotton fibers persist during the processing of cotton. For this reason, cotton factory workers may develop an allergy to cotton fibers. However, some allergic reactions in cotton factory workers are not caused by the cotton fibers themselves, but by allergens added to the fibers while the cotton is being processed. Moreover, the cotton dust to which cotton factory workers are exposed contains other components besides cotton, such as inorganic matter, bacteria, molds, and pesticide residue. Some of these may be allergenic.

Cotton Textile Products

Some people experience allergic reactions when they wear cotton clothing or when they sleep on cotton pillowcases. In some cases, they have a true cotton allergy. However, they may be reacting to allergens introduced into the fabric during its manufacture, such as formaldehyde. Alternatively, some people who think that they are allergic to cotton may actually react to dyes applied to cotton textiles. Detergents used to wash cotton fabrics may also contain allergens. These detergent allergens may adhere to the cotton fabric, where they may provoke an allergic reaction in a sensitized individual. Dust mites are another possible cause of an allergic reaction wrongly attributed to cotton.

Symptoms of Allergy

A cotton allergy may express itself in dermatitis, an inflammation of the skin characterized by such phenomena as rashes. The dermatitis may be atopic, which means that it can occur on parts of the body not in direct contact with the allergen. A cotton allergy may also express itself in respiratory problems, such as asthma and rhinitis, or inflammation of the nasal mucous membranes.

Dust Allergies

Wednesday, May 27th, 2015

 

Symptoms to Watch For

Dust allergy symptoms are similar to those of pollen allergies:

Red, itchy, watery eyes
Runny, itchy, stuffy nose
Sneezing

What Causes Dust Allergies?

It sounds nasty, but it’s true: One piece of dust can contain pet dander, pieces of dead cockroaches, and mold spores, along with dead skin and dust mites.

Both cockroaches and pet dander are common  allergy  triggers, too.

How Can I Prevent Symptoms?

The best strategy is to limit your exposure to dust.

Start in the bedroom, where you probably spend the most time. Large numbers of dust mites can gather in mattresses, bedding, and upholstered furniture.

Wear a mask while cleaning, too.

Bedroom Dust-Busting Tips

Put airtight, plastic dust-mite covers on pillows, mattresses, and box springs.

Use pillows filled with polyester fibers instead of kapok or feathers.

Wash bedding in very hot water (over 130 F) once a week. The water needs to be this hot to kill dust mites. Dry the bedding in a hot dryer.

If your bedroom is in a basement with a concrete floor, move upstairs if you can. Concrete stays damp and creates the moist, humid environment dust mites love.

Around the House

Clean bare floors often with a damp mop or cloth.

Vacuum carpets once or twice a week. Use a vacuum with a HEPA (high-efficiency particulate air) filter. If your dust allergy is severe, ask your doctor if replacing wall-to-wall carpeting with hardwood or vinyl floors would help.

Wash throw rugs in hot water.

Vacuum upholstered furniture such as sofas. Wood, leather, plaster, or metal furniture is better for dust allergies.

Replace drapes with roll-up window shades. If you must have curtains, wash them in hot water each season.

Get rid of stuffed animals, soft toys, and other dust collectors.

Keep Air Clean and Dry

Use an air conditioner or dehumidifier to lower humidity.

Keep humidity in your home below 55%. Use a hygrometer to measure it. You can get one at hardware and building supply stores.

How to Control Mosquitoes

Monday, May 11th, 2015
1.Get rid of potential mosquito breeding sites such as hollow stem plants (like bromeliads), old tires, bird baths and other vessels that could hold standing water. Mosquitoes lay their eggs either on or next to standing water or on damp soil that will be flooded after rain. Once the eggs have hatched they go from larvae to pupa to adult mosquito in anywhere from 4 days to one month depending on the species and the conditions. You may notice an influx of mosquitoes soon after rain when water levels rise.
2.Clean out roof guttering regularly.
3.Keep grass mown and shrubs trimmed where possible.
4.Wear tightly woven long sleeve tops and long pants.
5.Apply an insect repellent containing an active ingredient.
6.Invest in a good quality mosquito trap.
7.Have your yard sprayed with a suitable pesticide.
8.Use net screens to provide mosquito free areas.
9.Use Citronella around your yard. Citronella is an organic insect repellent that is available in various forms eg. candles, oil etc…

How to Avoid Pollen

Thursday, March 12th, 2015

 

Pollen is there to help plants reproduce, not to bug you. But it does. If you inhale it, it can cause allergy symptoms such as:

  • Sneezing
  • Watery eyes
  • Nasal congestion
  • Runny nose
  • Itchy throat
  • Cough

It’s a lot like a cold, plus a sore throat and hoarseness, and you usually get it like clockwork when the plants that make the bothersome pollen are blooming.

5 Ways to Keep Pollen Out of Your Home

  1. Close your windows and outside doors.
  2. Avoid using window and attic fans during pollen season. Use air-conditioning to cool your home.
  3. Roll up your car windows when driving. Use the air-conditioning if you need it.
  4. Dry clothing and bedding in the dryer. Don’t hang them outside.
  5. Remember that pets can bring in pollen on their fur, too. Don’t allow pets that spend time outdoors in your bedroom.

If you have to be outside, follow these guidelines to minimize your exposure to pollen:

  • Check pollen counts before planning outdoor activities.
  • Avoid being outdoors in the early morning, when pollen is most widespread.
  • Wear sunglasses to protect your eyes from pollen.
  • Have someone else mow your grass. Don’t rake leaves during pollen season. If you must do yard work, wear a mask.
  • Going on vacation? Look for a place where pollen is low, such as the beach, or take your medications with you.
  • Change your clothing when you come indoors. Shower and wash your hair first.

Mosquito Bite Allergy

Friday, January 2nd, 2015

Mosquito bite allergy symptoms include itching, hives, and swelling. 

Nearly everyone is sensitive to mosquito bites but, for those with a severe allergy, symptoms can be more than just annoying—they can be downright serious. Most bites occur at either dusk or dawn, when mosquitoes are most active. While male mosquitoes are harmless—feeding only on nectar and water—the females of the species are out for blood.

A female mosquito locks onto her victim using a combination of scent, exhaled carbon dioxide, and chemicals in the person’s sweat. When she finds a suitable meal, she lands on an area of exposed skin and inserts her proboscis to draw the victim’s blood. The common symptoms—a telltale red bump and itching—aren’t caused by the bite itself, but by a reaction of the body’s immune system to proteins in the mosquito’s saliva.

Who Is at Increased Risk for Mosquito Bites?

Researchers are unclear as to the reasons, but mosquitoes tend to prefer certain victims over others, including men, people who are overweight or obese, and those with type O blood. Also, because mosquitoes are attracted to heat, wearing dark colors (which absorb heat) may make a person more likely to be bitten.

Symptoms

The more times a person has been bitten by mosquitoes, the more likely they’ll become sensitized over time. That means adults typically have less serious reactions to mosquito bites than children do. Common symptoms of mosquito bites include soft bumps on the skin that may become pink, red, and itchy. Symptoms may occur up to 48 hours after the initial bite. Symptoms of a more severe allergic reaction may include:

  • large area of itching
  • lesions
  • lymphangitis (inflammation of the lymph system)
  • hives, which may appear at the site of both new and old bites
  • anaphylaxis: although rare, anaphylactic shock is a life-threatening condition that results in swelling in the throat and wheezing and requires immediate medical attention

Allergic reactions aren’t the only concern regarding mosquito bites. Mosquitoes can also transmit serious diseases such as malaria, dengue fever, and yellow fever (all rare in Western countries). Mosquitoes may also transmit the West Nile virus (found in North America). Signs that it may be something other than an allergic reaction include:

  • fever
  • severe headache
  • body aches
  • nausea or vomiting
  • rash
  • fatigue
  • light sensitivity
  • confusion
  • neurological changes (such as muscle weakness on one side of the body)
  • meningitis

A person exhibiting the above symptoms or other complications such as infection at the site of a bite after being bitten by a mosquito should contact their doctor immediately.

Prevention

As with other allergies, prevention is the best medicine. Mosquitoes require standing or stagnant water to breed. If possible, avoid standing water especially at dusk and dawn when mosquitoes are most active. Other ways to prevent mosquito bites include:

  • wearing protective, light-colored clothing such as long-sleeved shirts, long pants, socks, and a wide-brimmed hat
  • eliminating standing water around the home (unclog rain gutters, empty children’s pools, clean birdbaths, and empty unused containers such as flower pots)
  • applying insect repellents such as DEET (follow directions carefully) or use citronella-scented candles in outdoor areas or campsites
  • repairing holes in window or door screens

There is limited evidence that taking vitamin B-1 (thiamin) during the summer also may provide some protection against mosquito bites as well. Thiamin is thought to work by slightly changing a person’s scent. Studies are ongoing.

Treatment

Mosquitoes haven’t survived for millions of years by being anything less than determined. Even the best preventative measures probably won’t avert all bites. In the case of a normal reaction, a hydrocortisone cream or calamine lotion will provide relief from itching. A cold pack or ice cubes may help to relieve symptoms as well. For more serious allergic reactions, the following treatments may be used:

  • Take oral antihistamines (such as Benadryl or Claritin).
  • Use topical anti-itch lotion or athlete’s foot spray.
  • For hives, take a cool bath without soap or place ice cubes on itchy areas for 10 minutes.
  • A person in danger of anaphylaxis should carry an epinephrine autoinjector (EpiPen) in case of an emergency.

Symptoms and remedies of Pollen allergies

Wednesday, December 4th, 2013

Let’s be honest. If the miserable symptoms of pollen allergies don’t push you over the edge, some allergy relief medicines can. Sure, some older allergy relief medicines ease your symptoms, but they can also leave you feeling sluggish, sleepy, and unable to concentrate at work or school.
So how can something as miniscule as pollen make you feel absolutely awful? And where do you turn for effective allergy relief when you’re plagued by weeks of impenetrable pollen?
To know what you’re up against, it’s important to know something about pollen. Pollen, the microscopic powdery granules of flowering plants, is the mechanism for the fertilization of trees, grasses, and weeds.
While pollen from plants with bright flowers like roses rarely trigger allergy symptoms, the tiny, dry pollens from grasses, trees, and weeds are the main allergy culprits. Even though your yard may have no true pollen offenders, pollen particulates blow in the wind.
Certain nutrients are also supposed to be helpful in fighting pollen allergies. Quercetin, grape seed extract and vitamin C are all good sources of allergy relief. You can buy supplements or take them in through the foods you eat. Apples, bananas, onions and red wine all contain allergy-fighting nutrients. Plus, eating spicy foods like cayenne pepper, ginger, onion, garlic and fenugreek helps to thin the mucus that causes congestion. Rinsing your nose with saline is also a good trick to dilute mucous and get allergens out of your system. However, for some people, eating bananas, cucumbers, sunflower seeds, chamomile and Echinacea can worsen allergic symptoms.

Common

Monday, November 25th, 2013

 

 

Usefull Home Remedies For Rain Rot In Horse

Friday, June 8th, 2012

Keep Dry
Improve drainage in and around your horse pastures. Rain rot bacteria thrive in damp conditions. Sunlight and dry weather will reduce the dermatophilus congolensis bacteria that causes rain rot. During periods of prolonged rainfall, horses prone to rain rot should be kept indoors. If that is not practical, avoid pasturing in muddy areas.

Clip Hair
Keep your horse’s hair clipped to allow the skin to dry. This is most important for horses with long, thick hair, but all horses can benefit from a trim during wet weather. The hair tends to hold moisture close to the skin, creating conditions favored by rain rot bacteria. Disinfect your clipper and tools after grooming. Rain rot bacteria can live on these surfaces and reinfect your horse or spread to others.

Avoid Ointments
Do not use ointments on rain rot unless your veterinarian advises you to do so. Ointments, like wet hair, tend to hold moisture and prevent the skin from drying. Wash the affected areas with a mild antibacterial solution such as Betadine or Nolvasan, and allow the area to air dry. Continue to wash the affected areas for at least one week after symptoms subside. Some horse owners use one part Listerine to one part water.

Remove Scabs
Scab removal can be painful, but it is necessary because infection can grow under the scabs. Wash the affected areas with a mild antibacterial solution. As the scabs soften, very gently pick off the scabs. Use caution here; this is not something your horse is going to love. Start slowly and discontinue your efforts if your horse reacts strongly.

Stall Hygiene
Proper stall hygiene is essential for horses suffering from rain rot. This is a contagious condition and will spread to other horses, so it is necessary to muck out stalls every day and keep grooming tools clean and disinfected. Remove wet or soiled bedding as quickly as possible and compost it properly. Install wall-mounted water buckets or other spill-proof watering systems. Good stall hygiene also keeps biting insect populations to a minimum.

Special Remedies For Summer Allergies

Wednesday, June 6th, 2012

Here are the list of remedies for Summer Allergies :

1. Replace air filters in your home comfort system, following manufacturer instructions to locate and change the filter. Check your filter monthly, especially during seasons of heavy use or allergy season.

2. Eliminate mold from your home by keeping surfaces free of standing water. Check for moisture buildup and leaks in likely spots such as below sinks in the bathroom and kitchen. Have a professional heating and cooling technician inspect your duct system for leaks.

3. Check your home and ducts for mouse droppings or other evidence of contamination that could make allergies flare.

4. Make sure the house is well ventilated. This can be done without wasting energy. Ask your HVAC professional for advice on ventilation systems.

5. Install kitchen and bathroom exhaust fans to vent irritating particles and humidity outdoors. Be sure to use them as needed.

Remedies and medicines For Allergies

Monday, January 9th, 2012

An allergy is a hypersensitive reaction to a normally harmless substance. There are a variety of substances, termed allergens, that may trouble a sensitive individual. Common allergens include pollen, animal dander, house dust, feathers, mites, chemicals, and a variety of foods. Some allergies primarily cause respiratory symptoms; others can cause such diverse symptoms as headache, fatigue, fever, diarrhea, stomachache, and vomiting. This entry addresses respiratory allergies, both chronic and seasonal (for a discussion of allergic reactions caused by foods. Home remedies for allergies can help reduce and treat allergies symptoms.

Histamines cause a string of reactions, including the swelling and congestion of nasal passages and increased mucus production. This is essentially a hypersensitive, or overactive, response by the body to an external stimulus. You will not suffer any of these side effect using this home remedies for allergies.

Remedies For alergies :

1. Drink lots of water to thin secretions and ease expectoration.

2. If you have respiratory allergies, you may be allergic to certain foods. In addition to dairy products and wheat, common culprits include eggs, chocolate, nuts, seafood, and citrus fruits and juices. Try eliminating one of these foods for two weeks and watch for an improvement. Use an elimination or rotation diet to discover and work with food allergies.

3. Try eliminating dairy foods from your diet. Dairy foods can thicken mucus and stimulate an increase in mucus production. If your allergies are seasonal, it may also be helpful to avoid whole wheat during the allergy season; many allergy sufferers are sensitive to wheat.

4. Cut out cooked fats and oils. When your body is under any type of stress, including the stress of an allergic reaction, the digestive system is not as strong as usual, and fats—which are difficult to digest at the best of times—can put a strain on the digestive system. Also, undigested fats contribute to mucus production and foster a toxic internal environment.

5. Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) is a good source of sulfur, a trace mineral that may help to reduce the severity of the allergic response. Take 500 milligrams three or four times daily, with meals.

6. Selenium is an antioxidant and works synergistically with vitamin E. Take 50 to 100 micrograms twice a day during the allergy season.

Best Remedies For Allergy

Tuesday, September 20th, 2011

In order for true healing of allergies to occur, it is necessary to address their cause rather than just treat the outward manifestations or symptoms. ” This involves identifying the substances a person is allergic to and eliminating them from the diet and environment. At the same time, the body needs to be purged of toxins and the immune system needs to be stimulated. Since no two people are exactly alike, therapeutic approaches will vary, and usually a combination of therapies is the best course of action.”

Among the therapies which have proven most effective in treating allergies are diet and nutrition, herbal medicine, acupuncture, Ayurvedic medicine and homeopathy.

Home Remedies for SKIN ALLERGY

Tuesday, June 22nd, 2010

Grind 1 tbls of poppy seeds with 1-teaspoon water. Add 1-teaspoon limejuice. Apply to affected area for relief from skin allergies.
Add 1-teaspoon limejuice with sandalwood paste. Apply to affected skin allergy area
Avoid the foods, plants, animals, drugs, dust, or other substances that trigger an allergic reaction.
Smoking exacerbates allergic reactions. Those who are allergic to MSG (Monosodium Glutamate) should avoid smoking.
Vitamin C is very helpful in fighting with the allergic reactions.
Avoid white sugar, and everything made with it. The process of chemically whitening sugar is toxic.
Avoid bleached flours, and everything made with it.
Avoid all processed foods, including the frozen pre-packaged types.
Avoid the processes meat.
Thoroughly wash all fresh fruits and vegetables in warm water
Eat whole foods, and prepare your meals at home using fresh, natural products.
Prepare an eating schedule. It may be that 3 large meals per day or 4 or 5 smaller ones will be better.
Regularly practice juice fasting. This will cleanse your system of toxins and residues.
Avoid smoking and heavy alcohol consumption. Heavy coffee consumption is to be avoided ( 1 or 2 regular cups per day is not considered harmful )
Avoid fried foods and foods cooked in oil to prevent skin allergies. When oil is heated to cooking temperatures it begins to break down and has been identified as a carcinogen.
Regularly try to do regiment of moderate exercise, such as walking, biking or swimming and strive to live in harmonious surroundings that contribute to inner peace.
Rub an ice cube gently over the affected area. This cools the skin, reduces inflammation and soothes the itch immediately.
Pour boiling water over a bowl of oats. Cover the bowl and leave for 10 minutes.
Strain the oats away and pour the liquid into an ice cube tray. Freeze the oat liquid to form oat cubes. To relieve itch, rub and frozen oat cube gently over the affected area.
Apply aloe Vera gel on the affected areas. It will sooth the areas and gives a cooling effect.
Take 2 cups water, ½ teaspoon each Echinacea root and marshmallow root,
1 teaspoon chamomile flowers, ½ teaspoon peppermint leaf and ¼ teaspoon ginger rhizome. Combine water and Echinacea and marshmallow roots in a saucepan and simmer for about 5 minutes. Turn off heat and add remaining ingredients. Steep for 15 minutes, then strain out herbs. For a 50-pound child, give 1 to 2 cups daily.This is an effective home remedy for skin allergy.
Take 1 cup boiling water,1 teaspoon each calendula flowers, chamomile flowers, Echinacea root, elder flowers and yarrow flowers, 3 tablespoons baking soda. Pour boiling water over herbs and steep for 15 minutes, then strain out herbs. Stir in baking soda. Apply to irritated skin with a soft cloth or a sponge until itching is reduced. This is also an effective home remedy for skin allergy.
Drink 8-10 glasses of water daily.

Home Remedies For Allergies

Monday, May 17th, 2010

If you have allergies, you may suffer from a stuffy and/or runny nose, sneezing, itchy skin and eyes, and/or red, watery eyes. Needless to say, it can be very uncomfortable. These symptoms occur because, in the presence of an allergen, the immune system releases chemicals called histamines to fight what it perceives as an invader. Home remedies for allergies can treat all of the above mentioned symptoms.

Histamines cause a string of reactions, including the swelling and congestion of nasal passages and increased mucus production. This is essentially a hypersensitive, or overactive, response by the body to an external stimulus. You will not suffer any of these side effect using this home remedies for allergies.

Whether allergies are seasonal or chronic depends on the particular allergen or allergens involved. Seasonal allergies tend to be caused by pollen. Ongoing or chronic allergies are usually caused by factors that are present in the environment year-round, such as animal dander, dust, or feathers. Chronic allergic rhinitis is a persistent inflammation of the mucous membrane lining the nasal passages that is caused by an allergic reaction. It is characterized by a stuffy, runny nose, frequent sneezing, and a tendency to breathe through the mouth. The eyes may be red and watery. Headache, itchiness, nosebleeds, and fatigue may be secondary complications. Dark circles under the eyes (called “allergic shiners”), along with a puffy look to the face, are frequently seen.

Home remedies for allergies 1: Drink lots of water to thin secretions and ease expectoration.

Home remedies for allergies 2: If you have respiratory allergies, you may be allergic to certain foods. In addition to dairy products and wheat, common culprits include eggs, chocolate, nuts, seafood, and citrus fruits and juices. Try eliminating one of these foods for two weeks and watch for an improvement. Use an elimination or rotation diet to discover and work with food allergies.

Home remedies for allergies 3: Try eliminating dairy foods from your diet. Dairy foods can thicken mucus and stimulate an increase in mucus production. If your allergies are seasonal, it may also be helpful to avoid whole wheat during the allergy season; many allergy sufferers are sensitive to wheat.

Home remedies for allergies 4: Cut out cooked fats and oils. When your body is under any type of stress, including the stress of an allergic reaction, the digestive system is not as strong as usual, and fats—which are difficult to digest at the best of times—can put a strain on the digestive system. Also, undigested fats contribute to mucus production and foster a toxic internal environment.

Remedies For Allergies

Wednesday, April 28th, 2010

An allergy is a hypersensitive reaction to a normally harmless substance. There are a variety of substances, termed allergens, that may trouble a sensitive individual. Common allergens include pollen, animal dander, house dust, feathers, mites, chemicals, and a variety of foods. Some allergies primarily cause respiratory symptoms; others can cause such diverse symptoms as headache, fatigue, fever, diarrhea, stomachache, and vomiting. This entry addresses respiratory allergies, both chronic and seasonal (for a discussion of allergic reactions caused by foods. Home remedies for allergies can help reduce and treat allergies symptoms.
If you have allergies, you may suffer from a stuffy and/or runny nose, sneezing, itchy skin and eyes, and/or red, watery eyes. Needless to say, it can be very uncomfortable. These symptoms occur because, in the presence of an allergen, the immune system releases chemicals called histamines to fight what it perceives as an invader. Home remedies for allergies can treat all of the above mentioned symptoms.

Histamines cause a string of reactions, including the swelling and congestion of nasal passages and increased mucus production. This is essentially a hypersensitive, or overactive, response by the body to an external stimulus. You will not suffer any of these side effect using this home remedies for allergies.

Whether allergies are seasonal or chronic depends on the particular allergen or allergens involved. Seasonal allergies tend to be caused by pollen. Ongoing or chronic allergies are usually caused by factors that are present in the environment year-round, such as animal dander, dust, or feathers. Chronic allergic rhinitis is a persistent inflammation of the mucous membrane lining the nasal passages that is caused by an allergic reaction. It is characterized by a stuffy, runny nose, frequent sneezing, and a tendency to breathe through the mouth. The eyes may be red and watery. Headache, itchiness, nosebleeds, and fatigue may be secondary complications. Dark circles under the eyes (called “allergic shiners”), along with a puffy look to the face, are frequently seen.

Home remedies for allergies 1:  Drink lots of water to thin secretions and ease expectoration.

Home remedies for allergies 2:  If you have respiratory allergies, you may be allergic to certain foods. In addition to dairy products and wheat, common culprits include eggs, chocolate, nuts, seafood, and citrus fruits and juices. Try eliminating one of these foods for two weeks and watch for an improvement. Use an elimination or rotation diet to discover and work with food allergies.

Home remedies for allergies 3: Try eliminating dairy foods from your diet. Dairy foods can thicken mucus and stimulate an increase in mucus production. If your allergies are seasonal, it may also be helpful to avoid whole wheat during the allergy season; many allergy sufferers are sensitive to wheat.

Home remedies for allergies 4: Cut out cooked fats and oils. When your body is under any type of stress, including the stress of an allergic reaction, the digestive system is not as strong as usual, and fats—which are difficult to digest at the best of times—can put a strain on the digestive system. Also, undigested fats contribute to mucus production and foster a toxic internal environment.