Archive for the ‘Blood Pressure’ Category

10 Foods That Reduce High Blood Pressure

Thursday, May 14th, 2015

Bananas

Not only are they delicious, bananas also help reduce your risk of stroke and heart disease. They have the highest rate of potassium to sodium. Potassium is often recommended to people taking diuretics. So eating one to two bananas a day can help restore blood sugar levels as well.

Unsalted Sunflower Seeds

Sunflower seeds are also a great source of magnesium. A quarter cup of these makes a nutritious snack — but be sure to buy them unsalted, since salted sunflower seeds are high in sodium, which you want to avoid.

Dark Chocolate

A study published in the July 2007 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) suggests that eating small amounts of dark chocolate daily helps lower blood pressure. Flavanols, which are present in dark chocolates are known to improve several important cardiovascular risk factors and also reduce the risk of cardiovascular diseases.

Ground Flaxseed

Try adding ground flaxseed to almost anything you eat. They are high in fibre and can help those who are trying to maintain a strict and healthy diet. They also help lower cholesterol and are rich in omega-3 fatty acids, which fight inflammation and infections.

Spinach

A green leafy delight, spinach is low in calories, high in fibre, and packed with heart-healthy nutrients like potassium, foliate, and magnesium, they key ingredient for lowering and maintaining healthy blood pressure levels.

Tomatoes

They are rich in lycopene and other important antioxidants that helps reduce blood pressure. Tomatoes are a very good source of potassium. Diets rich in potassium have been shown to lower high blood pressure and reduce the risk of heart disease.

Garlic

Garlic is a good food to help fight hypertension because it acts as a blood thinner. When chopped, it also produces allicin, a compound that has antibacterial and anti-fungal properties. This can help fight many diseases that may result from hypertension, such as stroke and heart disease. Garlic also helps lower cholesterol.

Skimmed Milk

It truly does a body good! Drinking heart-healthy skim milk or 1 percent milk will provides calcium, potassium and vitamin D, three nutrients that work as a team to help reduce blood pressure levels by about 3 to 10 percent.

Soybeans

These provide ample potassium. When potassium is low, the body retains sodium and too much sodium raises blood pressure. When potassium is high, the body gets rid of sodium, keeping the BP low. Soybeans also contain isoflavones, which help lower blood pressure levels.

Whole grain foods (like oatmeal)

Whole grain foods are excellent sources of fibre, magnesium and other essential nutrients needed to maintain a healthy and balanced diet. Eating foods rich in fibre also keeps you feeling full for a longer period of time. Wiseman suggests whole grains that are high in potassium such as buckwheat and millet.

Best Home Made Medicines For High Blood Pressure

Tuesday, June 19th, 2012

High blood pressure or hypertension means high pressure (tension) in the arteries. Arteries are vessels that carry blood from the pumping heart to all the tissues and organs of the body. High blood pressure does not mean excessive emotional tension, although emotional tension and stress can temporarily increase blood pressure. Normal blood pressure is below 120/80; blood pressure between 120/80 and 139/89 is called “pre-hypertension”, and a blood pressure of 140/90 or above is considered high.

High blood pressure, also known as the silent killer, is one of the most prevalent conditions today, especially in America. However, not only is high blood pressure a dangerous condition in itself, the medication and drugs prescribed for it are also dangerous because of the high costs and the side effects.

Home made Medicines for High Blood Pressure are :

1. Apple Cider Vinegar

2. Coconut Water to Combat High Blood Pressure

3. Garlic

4. Aloe Vera, Hibiscus Tea, Cayenne Pepper

Useful Remedies for Low Blood Pressure

Tuesday, September 13th, 2011

 

Causes

1. Advanced diabetes

2. Anaphylaxis (a life-threatening allergic response)

3. Anti-anxiety agents

4. Changes in heart rhythm or arrhythmias

5. Nutritional deficiency

6. Dehydration

7. Emotional instability

8. Endocrine problems

9. Excessive intake of alcohol

10. Failure of the adrenal gland

11. Faulty nutrition, or malnutrition

12. Heart attack

13. Heart failure

REMEDIES

1. The best and the most effective home remedy for treating low blood pressure would be to consume lots of water. This is because dehydration reduces blood volume and leads to a drop in the blood pressure.

2. Beetroot juice is beneficial for those suffering from low blood pressure. So, have a cup of raw beetroot juice two times a day.

3. Prepare a cup of strong black coffee and consume this whenever you feel that your blood pressure is dipping.

4. Put 15-20 gm of Indian Spikenard in 250 ml water and boil it. Now, remove from heat and let it cool down. Have this infusion thrice a day. You can also have 30-40 grains of Indian Spikenard, along with some camphor and cinnamon.

5. Fill your bathtub with lukewarm water and add one kg of Epsom salt to it. Immerse yourself in the bath for 20 minutes, before going to bed. Take caution not to expose the body to a cold area after this.

6. In a bowl of water, soak 7 almonds and keep them overnight. Peel them and prepare a paste. Add this paste to lukewarm milk and drink it.

7. Take a bowl of water and soak 30 raisins in it, overnight. Chew them one by one, on an empty stomach, in the morning and have water.

8. Holy basil works effectively in curing low blood pressure. Take about 15 holy basil leaves and crush them. Filter the mixture with the help of a muslin cloth. Have this filtered mixture, along with a tsp of honey, on an empty stomach.

What is high blood pressure?

Wednesday, April 7th, 2010

High blood pressure (HBP) or hypertension means high pressure (tension) in the arteries. Arteries are vessels that carry blood from the pumping heart to all the tissues and organs of the body. High blood pressure does not mean excessive emotional tension, although emotional tension and stress can temporarily increase blood pressure. Normal blood pressure is below 120/80; blood pressure between 120/80 and 139/89 is called “pre-hypertension”, and a blood pressure of 140/90 or above is considered high.

The top number, the systolic blood pressure, corresponds to the pressure in the arteries as the heart contracts and pumps blood forward into the arteries. The bottom number, the diastolic pressure, represents the pressure in the arteries as the heart relaxes after the contraction. The diastolic pressure reflects the lowest pressure to which the arteries are exposed.

An elevation of the systolic and/or diastolic blood pressure increases the risk of developing heart (cardiac) disease, kidney (renal) disease, hardening of the arteries (atherosclerosis or arteriosclerosis), eye damage, and stroke (brain damage). These complications of hypertension are often referred to as end-organ damage because damage to these organs is the end result of chronic (long duration) high blood pressure. For that reason, the diagnosis of high blood pressure is important so efforts can be made to normalize blood pressure and prevent complications.

It was previously thought that rises in diastolic blood pressure were a more important risk factor than systolic elevations, but it is now known that in people 50 years or older systolic hypertension represents a greater risk.

The American Heart Association estimates high blood pressure affects approximately one in three adults in the United States – 73 million people. High blood pressure is also estimated to affect about two million American teens and children, and the Journal of the American Medical Association reports that many are under-diagnosed. Hypertension is clearly a major public health problem.

What is Blood Pressure

Monday, September 4th, 2006

Blood pressure is the force of the blood against the artery walls. High blood pressure (hypertension) and low blood pressure (hypotension) can both cause cardiovascular problems.

Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring or tilt table tests may be used to diagnose these conditions. There are many types of high blood pressure, which may be treated with antihypertensive medications, such as diuretics, beta blockers and ACE inhibitors.

How blood pressure is measured

Monday, September 4th, 2006

Hypertension can be mild, moderate or severe. Your blood pressure is naturally higher when you are exerting yourself, such as during physical exercise. It is only a concern if your blood pressure is high when you are at rest, because this means your heart is overworked and your arteries have extra stress in their walls.

Blood pressure is measured in two ways:

insulin-and-blood-pressure.jpg

 

Systolic – the highest pressure against the arteries as the heart pumps. The normal systolic pressure is usually between 110 and 130 mm Hg. 

  Diastolic – the pressure against the arteries as the heart relaxes and fills with blood. The normal diastolic pressure is usually between 70 and 80 mm Hg.

Normal Blood Pressure

Monday, September 4th, 2006

Levels around 130/80 and below are absolutely fine. Doctors are generally concerned when levels are consistently greater than 140/90, as this is the level above which blood pressure starts significantly contributing to the long term risk of increased cardiovascular problems (strokes and heart attacks).

Depending on the exact classification used, pressures around 140-150/90-100 would be called mild hypertension. Pressures around 150-170/100-110 would be called moderate, and pressures higher, e.g. 200/120 would be considered fairly severe.

In reality blood pressure is a continuum, and it is sometimes difficult to be categoric about exactly what category a person is in. The higher the pressure is, the greater the risk that it will lead to further problems.

Causes of High Blood Pressure

Monday, September 4th, 2006

images1.jpgThe causes of high blood pressure vary. Causes may include narrowing of the arteries, a greater than normal volume of blood, or the heart beating faster or more forcefully than it should. Any of these conditions will cause increased pressure against the artery walls. High blood pressure might also be caused by another medical problem. Most of the time, the cause is not known. Although high blood pressure usually cannot be cured, in most cases it can be prevented and controlled.

Causes of High Blood Pressure

Monday, September 4th, 2006

The causes of high blood pressure vary. Causes may include narrowing of the arteries, a greater than normal volume of blood, or the heart beating faster or more forcefully than it should. Any of these conditions will cause increased pressure against the artery walls. High blood pressure might also be caused by another medical problem. Most of the time, the cause is not known. Although high blood pressure usually cannot be cured, in most cases it can be prevented and controlled.

Keep high blood pressure under control

Monday, September 4th, 2006

If you are diagnosed with high blood pressure, it’s extremely important that you follow your doctor’s treatment guidelines to the letter. These guidelines include keeping your diet low in fat, reducing your salt intake, quitting smoking, and limiting your alcohol consumption.

In addition, you should exercise regularly, keep your weight within normal bounds, and learn to manage stress (instead of letting it manage you). Some recent research suggests that constant stress and pressure may predispose some men to continually elevated blood pressure later in life.

Treatment of High Blood Pressure

Monday, September 4th, 2006

images3.jpgTreatment of  high blood pressure is depended on how high it is and on what other ‘risk factors’ one have for heart disease and stroke.

Blood Pressure between 140/90-160/100mmHg will simply require some changes in lifestyle. You will probably not need to take tablets providing that the changes you make work. However, some people with a blood pressure in this range may be asked to take tablets if they are older or have other risk factors for heart disease and stroke, such as high cholesterol, smoking or already have complications such as a previous stroke or heart attack.

So, if you have a blood pressure reading in this range you may need to make the following changes to your lifestyle:

  • Cut down the amount of salt you are eating to 6 grams each day or less
  • Eat at least five portions of fruit and vegetables every day, preferably more
  • Be physically active at least five times a weeks for at least 30 minutes
  • Lose weight if you are overweight
  • Cut down on the amount of alcohol you are drinking if it is excessive, ie, men should drink no more than three or four units a day, women no more than two or three units each day

If your blood pressure is consistently over 160/100mmHg then you will probably be given tablets to take as well as being asked to make changes to your lifestyle. The aim of this treatment is to lower your blood pressure down to below 140/85mmHg whilst making sure that you feel fit and well. If you have diabetes or have had a previous stroke or heart attack you may be asked to lower your blood pressure further, to 130/80mmHg. A small number of people may find their blood pressure very difficult to control even with medication.

Lowering Blood Pressure Can Stop or Reverse Heart Disease

Wednesday, August 9th, 2006

Keeping hypertension at bay as important as reducing cholesterol, study suggests

MONDAY, Aug. 7 (HealthDay News) — Aggressive reduction of blood pressure in people with coronary artery disease may stop, and even reverse, the disease, U.S. researchers report.

In fact, lowering patients’ blood pressure may be as important as treatment to reduce cholesterol, said researchers at the Cleveland Clinic. They suggested that blood pressure levels currently recommended for coronary artery disease patients are not low enough for optimal control or reversal of the disease.

“Our results have important implications. They indicate that patients with coronary artery disease, such as those with previous heart attacks, could benefit from more aggressive lowering of their blood pressure, much like aggressive cholesterol management,” cardiologist Dr. Ilke Sipahi said in a prepared statement.

More information : The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has more about coronary artery disease (www.nhlbi.nih.gov ).

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Tuesday, August 8th, 2006

 

 

Controlling Blood Pressure

Tuesday, August 8th, 2006

People with high blood pressure can benefit from aerobic exercise. A 45-minute run can lower blood pressure for up to 24 hours. If you can´t go that far, start with what you can and move up. Other aerobic exercise can also help. Choose what you enjoy. New research shows strength training also helps control blood pressure.