Archive for the ‘Iron deficiency’ Category

Symptoms of Iron Deficiency Anemia

Friday, February 27th, 2015

Who Is at Risk for Iron-Deficiency Anemia?

Anemia is a common condition and can occur in both men and women, in all ages and ethnic groups. The risk for iron-deficiency anemia is higher in the following groups:

1. women of child-bearing age
2. pregnant women
3. people with poor diets
4. frequent blood donors
5. infants and children, especially those born prematurely or experiencing a growth spurt
6. vegetarians who do not replace meat with another iron-rich food

Symptoms of Iron Deficiency Anemia

Symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia can be very mild at first, and may go completely unnoticed. In fact, most people do not realize they have mild anemia until it is identified in a routine blood test .

Symptoms of moderate to severe iron-deficiency anemia include:

  • general fatigue
  • weakness
  • pale skin
  • shortness of breath
  • dizziness
  • strange cravings for non-food items, such as dirt, ice, and clay
  • tingling or a crawling feeling in the legs
  • swelling or soreness in the tongue
  • cold hands and feet
  • fast or irregular heartbeat
  • brittle nails
  • headaches

 

Factors which Affect Iron Absorption and Retention

Saturday, February 14th, 2015
    • The most important factor is your existing iron level. A low iron level will increase absorption, while a high iron level will decrease absorption. In general, you absorb 10-15% of the iron from foods.
    • Vitamin C will increase the absorption of nonheme iron by as much as 85%.
    • Tannins, oxalates, polyphenols, and phytates found in tea and coffee can reduce the absorption of non-heme iron by up to 65%. Black tea reduces absorption more than green tea and coffee.
    • The following teas and beverages also inhibit iron absorption: Peppermint tea, penny royal, cocoa, vervain, lime flower, chamomile, and most other herbal teas with polyphenols.
    • Calcium, polyphenols, and phytates found in legumes, whole grains, and chocolate can reduce absorption of nonheme iron.
    • Some protein from soy products may inhibit nonheme iron absorption.
    • Calcium, milk, and antacids can inhibit absorption of iron supplements.
    • High fiber foods, such as whole grains, raw vegetables, and bran can inhibit absorption of iron supplements.
    • Foods or drinks with caffeine can inhibit absorption of iron supplements.

 

Home Remedies for Iron Deficiency

Monday, December 30th, 2013

Iron is a mineral needed by our bodies. Iron is a part of all cells and does many things in our bodies. For example, iron carries oxygen from our lungs throughout our bodies. Having too little hemoglobin is called anemia. Iron also helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is a part of many enzymes and is used in many cell functions. Enzymes help our bodies digest foods and also help with many other important reactions that occur within our bodies. When our bodies don’t have enough iron, many parts of our bodies are affected.
Iron deficiency is a condition resulting from too little iron in the body. Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional deficiency and the leading cause of anemia in India.
The terms anemia, iron deficiency, and iron deficiency anemia often are used interchangeably but equivalent. Iron deficiency ranges from depleted iron stores without functional or health impairment to iron deficiency with anemia, which affects the functioning of several organ systems.
Iron deficiency can delay normal activity and movement or mental function.
Iron deficiency anemia during pregnancy can increase risk for small or early preterm babies. Small or early babies are more likely to have health problems or die in the first year of life than infants who are born full term and are not small.
Iron deficiency can cause fatigue that impairs the ability to do physical work in adults. Iron deficiency may also affect memory or other mental function in teens.
In generally, you can eat a healthful diet that includes good sources of iron. A healthful diet includes fruits, vegetables, whole grains, fat free or nonfat milk and milk products, lean meats, fish, dry beans, eggs, nuts, and is low in saturated fat, trans fats, cholesterol, salt, and added sugars. For example, you can eat a fruit or vegetable that is a good source of vitamin C with a food or meal that contains non -heme iron. Vitamin C helps your body absorb the non-heme iron foods you eat, especially when the food containing non-heme iron and the vitamin-C rich food are eaten at the same meal.