Archive for the ‘Diabetes’ Category

10 Myths of diatetes

Friday, March 21st, 2014

Myth #1  You can catch diabetes from someone else.
No.  Although we don’t know exactly why some people develop diabetes, we know diabetes is not contagious.  It can’t be caught like a cold or flu.  There seems to be some genetic link in diabetes, particularly type 2 diabetes.  Lifestyle factors also play a part.

Myth #2  People with diabetes can’t eat sweets or chocolate.
If eaten as part of a healthy meal plan, or combined with exercise, sweets and desserts can be eaten by people with diabetes.  They are no more “off limits” to people with diabetes, than they are to people without diabetes.

Myth #3  Eating too much sugar causes diabetes.
No.  Diabetes is caused by a combination of genetic and lifestyle factors.  However, being overweight does increase your risk for developing type 2 diabetes.  If you have a history of diabetes in your family, eating a healthy meal plan and regular exercise are recommended to manage your weight.

Myth #4  People with diabetes should eat special diabetic foods.
A healthy meal plan for people with diabetes is the same as that for everyone – low in fat (especially saturated and trans fat), moderate in salt and sugar, with meals based on whole grain foods, vegetables and fruit.  Diabetic and “dietetic” versions of sugar-containing foods offer no special benefit. They still raise blood glucose levels, are usually more expensive and can also have a laxative effect if they contain sugar alcohols.

Myth #5  If you have diabetes, you should only eat small amounts of starchy foods, such as bread, potatoes and pasta. 
Starchy foods are part of a healthy meal plan.  What is important is the portion size.  Whole grain breads, cereals, pasta, rice and starchy vegetables like potatoes, yams, peas and corn can be included in your meals and snacks.  The key is portions.  For most people with diabetes, having 3-4 servings of carbohydrate-containing foods is about right.  Whole grain starchy foods are also a good source of fiber, which helps keep your gut healthy.

Myth #6  People with diabetes are more likely to get colds and other illnesses.
No.  You are no more likely to get a cold or another illness if you have diabetes.  However, people with diabetes are advised to get flu shots. This is because any infection interferes with your blood glucose management, putting you at risk of high blood glucose levels and, for those with type 1 diabetes, an increased risk of ketoacidosis.

Myth #7  Insulin causes atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) and high blood pressure.
No, insulin does not cause atherosclerosis.  In the laboratory, there is evidence that insulin can initiate some of the early processes associated with atherosclerosis.  Therefore, some physicians were fearful that insulin might aggravate the development of high blood pressure and hardening of the arteries.  But it doesn’t.

Myth #8  Insulin causes weight gain, and because obesity is bad for you, insulin should not be taken.
Both the UKPDS (United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study) and the DCCT (Diabetes Control & Complications Trial) have shown that the benefit of glucose management with insulin far outweighs (no pun intended) the risk of weight gain.

Myth #9  Fruit is a healthy food.  Therefore, it is ok to eat as much of it as you wish.
Fruit is a healthy food.  It contains fiber and lots of vitamins and minerals.  Because fruit contains carbohydrate, it needs to be included in your meal plan.  Talk to your dietitian about the amount, frequency and types of fruits you should eat.

Myth #10  You don’t need to change your diabetes regimen unless your A1C is greater than 8 percent.
The better your glucose control, the less likely you are to develop complications of diabetes.  An A1C in the sevens (7s), however, does not represent good control.  The ADA goal is less than 7 percent.  The closer your A1C is to the normal range (less than 6 percent), the lower your chances of complications.  However, you increase your risk of hypoglycemia, especially if you have type 1 diabetes.  Talk with your health care provider about the best goal for you.

Source : American Diabetes Association

Get rid of diabetes

Wednesday, November 20th, 2013

Diabetes is the condition that results from lack of insulin in a person’s blood, or their body has a problem using the insulin it produces (Insulin resistance). There are other kinds of diabetes, like diabetes insipidus. However, when people say “diabetes”, they usually mean diabetes mellitus. People with diabetes mellitus are called “diabetics”. Glucose is not regular sugar that is available in stores and supermarkets. Glucose is a natural carbohydrate that our bodies use as a source of energy. The kind of sugar sold in supermarkets is called sucrose, and is much different from glucose. High concentrations of glucose can be found in soft drinks and fruits. Glucose level in the blood is controlled by several hormones. Hormones are chemicals in your body that send messages from cells to other cells. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas. When you eat, the pancreas makes insulin to send a message to other cells in the body. This insulin tells the cells to take up glucose from the blood. The glucose is used by cells for energy. Extra glucose that is not needed right away is stored in some cells as glycogen. When you are not eating, cells break down glycogen into glucose to use as energy.
Type 1 diabetes mellitus
Type 1 diabetes mellitus happens when the part of the pancreas that makes insulin is destroyed by that person’s own immune system. When the pancreas does not make insulin, glucose – sugar – in the blood cannot get into the parts of the body that need sugar to live. In order to live, a person with Type 1 diabetes must take insulin for the rest of their life. They need to check their blood sugar level on a regular basis, often, many times each day. Type 1 diabetes happens most of the time in younger people, however it can occur in adults, although this is much less common. About 1 out of every 10 people with diabetes have Type 1 Diabetes.
Type 2 diabetes mellitus
Type 2 diabetes mellitus is an illness very different from Type 1 diabetes. In Type 2 diabetes, the person makes insulin, but either the insulin does not work in that person’s body as it should, or they do not make enough insulin to process the glucose. When insulin does not work as it should, glucose (sugar) in the blood cannot get into the parts of the body that need sugar. Type 2 diabetes happens most of the time in an older person who is overweight.
Gestational diabetes
Gestational diabetes mellitus is like Type 2 diabetes. It happens to some women when they are pregnant.
Other types of diabetes include but are not limited to: Latent autoimmune diabetes of adults (LADA)
Maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY)
The goal of treatment for diabetes is to maintain blood glucose levels as close to normal as possible. There are three basic treatments:

1. Diet: Changes in diet to be 30 percent fat (mostly monounsaturated fat and polyunsaturated fat), 40-55 percent carbohydrates (high fiber, low glycemic index) and 15 percent protein. The distribution of carbohydrates and calories throughout the day are important, as well as limiting total calories to achieve a near ideal body weight. These changes will lower blood glucose and lipid levels.
2. Exercise: Exercise burns calories and muscle glycogen, which lowers blood glucose. Exercise decreases insulin resistance, which allows insulin to normally manage glucose levels.
3. Medications:
- Oral medications reduce blood glucose levels by:
1. Improving insulin release from the pancreas,
2. Reducing the available glucose
3. Decreasing insulin resistance.

Diabetes – Treatment and Advice

Wednesday, September 14th, 2011

Diabetes is a metabolic disorder that prevents the body from utilizing glucose completely or partially. There are basically two types of diabetes

1. Type 1 diabetes mellitus (insulin-dependent diabetes)
2. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (non-insulin-dependent diabetes)

Some Natural Remedies

1. Boil 15 fresh Mango leaves in 1 glass of water. Leave overnight. Filter this water and drink first thing in the morning. It is an effective home remedy for diabetes

2. Mix 1/2 teaspoon of ground bay leaf and 1/2 teaspoon turmeric in 1 tablespoon aloe vera gel. Take this mixture two times a day before lunch and dinner. It is also good diabetes mellitus treatments.

3. Drink a watery juice of a small Bitter Gourd (remove seeds) every morning. It is one of the best home remedies for diabetes.

4. Add 3-table spoon of cinnamon to 1 litre of boiling water. Simmer for 20 minutes in a low flame, and then strain the mixture. Drink this mixture daily to cure diabetes.

5. Eat tender curry leaves (fresh) twice a day to reduce sugar.

6. Take the juice of crushed fish-berry (amruth) soaked in water for a day first thing in the morning.

Home Remedies for Diabetes

Monday, June 13th, 2011

Diabetes treatment with Bitter Gourd: Home Remedy for Diabetes

Among the several home remedies that have proved helpful in controlling diabetes, perhaps the most vital is the use of bitter gourd. It has lately been established that bitter gourd contains a hypoglycaemic or insulin-like principle, designated as ‘plantinsulin’, which has been found precious in lowering the blood and urine sugar levels. It should, therefore, be included generously in the diet of the diabetic. For better results, the diabetic must take the juice of about four or five karelas each morning on an empty stomach. The seeds can be added to food in a powdered state. Diabetics can also use bitter gourd in the state of a decoction by boiling the pieces in water or in the form of dry powder. One of the good home remedies for diabetes.

Diabetes treatment with Indian Gooseberry: Home Remedy for Diabetes

Indian gooseberry, with its high vitamin C content, is considered precious in diabetes. A tablespoon of its juice, mixed with a cup of bitter gourd juice, taken daily for two months, will arouses the islets of Langerhans, that is, the isolated group of cells that secrete the hormone insulin in the pancreas. This mixture decreases the blood sugar in diabetes.

Diabetes treatment with Jambul Fruit: Home Remedy for Diabetes

Jambul fruit is another useful home remedy. It is regarded in customary medicine as a specific against diabetes because of its effect on the pancreas. The fruit as such, the seeds, and fruit juice are all helpful in the treatment of this disease. The seeds contain a glucoside ‘jamboline’ which is supposed to have the power to check the pathological conversion of starch into sugar in cases of increased production of glucose. The seeds must be dried and powdered. One teaspoon of this powder should be mixed in one cup of milk or water or half a cup of curd, and taken two times daily. The internal bark of the jambul tree is also used in the treatment of diabetes. The bark is dried out and burnt. It will create an ash of white colour. This ash must be pestled in mortar, strained and bottled.

Diabetes treatment with Bengal Gram

Experiments have shown that the drinking of water extract of Bengal gram enhances the use of glucose in both diabetic and normal persons. When kept on a diet which incorporated liberal supplements of Bengal gram extract, the condition of tile patient improved considerably and his insulin requirement was decreased to about twenty units per day. Diabetes patients who are on a set diet which does not severely limit the intake of carbohydrates, but includes liberal amounts of Bengal gram extract, have shown significant improvement in their fasting blood sugar levels, glucose tolerance, urinary excretion of sugar, and general condition.

Remedies for Diabetes

Thursday, May 27th, 2010

Do’s and Don’t for Diabetes

Following are some of the simple tips to prevent diabetes:

- Avoid eating starchy foodstuffs as they are not easily digestible.

- Take less amount of oil in your food.

- Avoid coffee, sugar, refined flour and alcohol.

- Do not take heavy meals. Eat small meals as the foods are easily digestible and are good for the health of diabetics.

- Take low fat diet and eat vegetables like spinach, cucumber.

- Eat fruits and milk products like cheese.

- Onion, sprouts, beans, garlic and tomatoes lower the sugar level in the blood.

- Live a stress free life. Stress will worsen the conditions.

- Restrict intake of mutton and excess salt in your meal. This will help in controlling your body weight and diabetes.

- It is advised to eat bitter herbs like bitter gourd and fenugreek. They are excellent bitter herbs for diabetic patients.

- There is no restriction on fish and soy for a diabetic patient.

- Do not eat junk food and oily food as this will control your level of cholesterol, lowers your blood pressure level, and diabetes.

- Avoid white bread, rice, potatoes, sweet and sugary foods.

Home Remedies for Diabetes

Monday, May 3rd, 2010

Following are some of the effective home remedies for diabetes :

1. Boil 15 fresh Mango leaves in 1 glass of water. Leave overnight. Filter this water and drink first thing in the morning. It is an effective home remedy for diabetes
2. Mix 1/2 teaspoon of ground bay leaf and 1/2 teaspoon turmeric in 1 tablespoon aloe vera gel. Take this mixture two times a day before lunch and dinner. It is also good diabetes mellitus treatments.
3. Drink a watery juice of a small Bitter Gourd (remove seeds) every morning. It is one of the best home remedies for diabetes.
4. Add 3-table spoon of cinnamon to 1 litre of boiling water. Simmer for 20 minutes in a low flame, and then strain the mixture. Drink this mixture daily to cure diabetes.
5. Eat tender curry leaves (fresh) twice a day to reduce sugar.
6. Take the juice of crushed fish-berry (amruth) soaked in water for a day first thing in the morning.

Wednesday, April 21st, 2010

Symptoms of Diabetes Mellitus

Following are the major diabetes symptoms:

1. Increased thirst
2. Frequent urination
3. Increase in appetite
4. Weight loss in type 1 diabetes
5. Obesity in type 2 diabetes
6. Skin irritation or infection
7. Decreased healing capacity
8. Weakness or loss of strength
9. Erection problems

Causes of Diabetes

Following are the major diabetes causes:

1. Hereditary factors
2. Excess intake of carbohydrate foods like chocolates, rice etc
3. Insulin deficiency
4. Insulin resistance
5. High blood pressure
6. High cholesterol
7. Stressful and over burdened life
8. Lack of exercise or physical activities
9. Excess eating habits

Diabetes Complications

1. Hardening of the arteries (atherosclerosis)
2. Heart problems
3. Eye problems
4. Blindness
5. kidney problems
6. Nerve problems

Natural Home Remedies for Diabetes

Following are some of the effective home remedies for diabetes:

1. Boil 15 fresh Mango leaves in 1 glass of water. Leave overnight. Filter this water and drink first thing in the morning. It is an effective home remedy for diabetes
2. Mix 1/2 teaspoon of ground bay leaf and 1/2 teaspoon turmeric in 1 tablespoon aloe vera gel. Take this mixture two times a day before lunch and dinner. It is also good diabetes mellitus treatments.
3. Drink a watery juice of a small Bitter Gourd (remove seeds) every morning. It is one of the best home remedies for diabetes.
4. Add 3-table spoon of cinnamon to 1 litre of boiling water. Simmer for 20 minutes in a low flame, and then strain the mixture. Drink this mixture daily to cure diabetes.
5. Eat tender curry leaves (fresh) twice a day to reduce sugar.
6. Take the juice of crushed fish-berry (amruth) soaked in water for a day first thing in the morning.

Diabetes treatment

Wednesday, August 16th, 2006

 

  • The mainstay of non-pharmacological diabetes treatment is diet and physical activity.
  • About 40% of diabetes sufferers require oral agents for satisfactory blood glucose control, and some 40% need insulin injections. This hormone was isolated by Frederic Banting and Charles Best in 1921 in Canada. It revolutionized the treatment of diabetes and prevention of its complications, transforming Type 1 diabetes from a fatal disease to one in which long-term survival became achievable.
  • People with Type 1 diabetes are usually totally dependent on insulin injections for survival. Such people require daily administration of insulin. The majority of people suffering from diabetes have the Type 2 form. Although they do not depend on insulin for survival, about one third of sufferers needs insulin for reducing their blood glucose levels.
  • Insulin is unavailable and unaffordable in many poor countries, despite being listed by WHO as an essential drug. Access to insulin by those who require it is a subject of special concern to international health agencies and national health authorities.

Dietary Tips for Diabetes patients

Wednesday, August 16th, 2006

Dietary Tips

  • Eat a wide variety of foods. Having a colorful plate is the best way to ensure that you are eating plenty of fruits, vegetables, meats, and other forms of protein such as nuts, dairy products, and grains/cereals.
  • Maintain a healthy weight.
  • Choose foods high in fiber such as whole grain breads, fruit, and cereal. They contain important vitamins and minerals. You need 25 to 35 grams of fiber per day. Studies have shown that people with type 2 diabetes who eat a high fiber diet can improve their blood sugar and cholesterol levels. Similar results have been shown in some studies in people with type 1 diabetes.
  • Watch your portions. Eat only the amount of food in your meal plan. Excess calories results in excess amounts of stored energy from food which results in excess fat and excess weight. In people with type 2 diabetes excess body fat means less sensitivity to insulin. The dietitian will help you determine what portion sizes you can eat. This will be determined based on many things such as whether you need to lose weight, maintain weight, have high sugars or suffer from low sugars.
  • In women with gestational diabetes, eat multiple meals and snacks per day as recommended.
  • Do not skip meals.
  • Eat meals and snacks at regular times every day. If you are taking a diabetes medicine, eat your meals and take your medicine at the same times each day.

Note: If you are taking some of the newer diabetes medicines, some of these tips may not apply to you; ask your health care provider the tips you should follow.

10 Myths for Diabetes

Wednesday, August 16th, 2006

Myth #1  You can catch diabetes from someone else.
No.  Although we don’t know exactly why some people develop diabetes, we know diabetes is not contagious.  It can’t be caught like a cold or flu.  There seems to be some genetic link in diabetes, particularly type 2 diabetes.  Lifestyle factors also play a part.

Myth #2  People with diabetes can’t eat sweets or chocolate.
If eaten as part of a healthy meal plan, or combined with exercise, sweets and desserts can be eaten by people with diabetes.  They are no more “off limits” to people with diabetes, than they are to people without diabetes. 

Myth #3  Eating too much sugar causes diabetes. 
No.  Diabetes is caused by a combination of genetic and lifestyle factors.  However, being overweight does increase your risk for developing type 2 diabetes.  If you have a history of diabetes in your family, eating a healthy meal plan and regular exercise are recommended to manage your weight.

Myth #4  People with diabetes should eat special diabetic foods.
A healthy meal plan for people with diabetes is the same as that for everyone – low in fat (especially saturated and trans fat), moderate in salt and sugar, with meals based on whole grain foods, vegetables and fruit.  Diabetic and “dietetic” versions of sugar-containing foods offer no special benefit. They still raise blood glucose levels, are usually more expensive and can also have a laxative effect if they contain sugar alcohols.

Myth #5  If you have diabetes, you should only eat small amounts of starchy foods, such as bread, potatoes and pasta. 
Starchy foods are part of a healthy meal plan.  What is important is the portion size.  Whole grain breads, cereals, pasta, rice and starchy vegetables like potatoes, yams, peas and corn can be included in your meals and snacks.  The key is portions.  For most people with diabetes, having 3-4 servings of carbohydrate-containing foods is about right.  Whole grain starchy foods are also a good source of fiber, which helps keep your gut healthy.

Myth #6  People with diabetes are more likely to get colds and other illnesses. 
No.  You are no more likely to get a cold or another illness if you have diabetes.  However, people with diabetes are advised to get flu shots. This is because any infection interferes with your blood glucose management, putting you at risk of high blood glucose levels and, for those with type 1 diabetes, an increased risk of ketoacidosis.

Myth #7  Insulin causes atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) and high blood pressure.
No, insulin does not cause atherosclerosis.  In the laboratory, there is evidence that insulin can initiate some of the early processes associated with atherosclerosis.  Therefore, some physicians were fearful that insulin might aggravate the development of high blood pressure and hardening of the arteries.  But it doesn’t.

Myth #8  Insulin causes weight gain, and because obesity is bad for you, insulin should not be taken. 
Both the UKPDS (United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study) and the DCCT (Diabetes Control & Complications Trial) have shown that the benefit of glucose management with insulin far outweighs (no pun intended) the risk of weight gain. 

Myth #9  Fruit is a healthy food.  Therefore, it is ok to eat as much of it as you wish. 
Fruit is a healthy food.  It contains fiber and lots of vitamins and minerals.  Because fruit contains carbohydrate, it needs to be included in your meal plan.  Talk to your dietitian about the amount, frequency and types of fruits you should eat.

Myth #10  You don’t need to change your diabetes regimen unless your A1C is greater than 8 percent.
The better your glucose control, the less likely you are to develop complications of diabetes.  An A1C in the sevens (7s), however, does not represent good control.  The ADA goal is less than 7 percent.  The closer your A1C is to the normal range (less than 6 percent), the lower your chances of complications.  However, you increase your risk of hypoglycemia, especially if you have type 1 diabetes.  Talk with your health care provider about the best goal for you.  

Source : American Diabetes Association

Major Types of Diabetes

Wednesday, August 16th, 2006

Type 1 diabetes
Results from the body’s failure to produce insulin, the hormone that “unlocks” the cells of the body, allowing glucose to enter and fuel them. It is estimated that 5-10% of Americans who are diagnosed with diabetes have type 1 diabetes.

Type 2 diabetes
Results from insulin resistance (a condition in which the body fails to properly use insulin), combined with relative insulin deficiency. Most Americans who are diagnosed with diabetes have type 2 diabetes.

Gestational diabetes
Gestational diabetes affects about 4% of all pregnant women – about 135,000 cases in the United States each year.

Pre-diabetes
Pre-diabetes is a condition that occurs when a person’s blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not high enough for a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. There are 41 million Americans who have pre-diabetes, in addition to the 20.8 million with diabetes.

How do you get Diabetes?

Wednesday, August 16th, 2006


There are two main types of diabetes mellitus. These are known as type 1 and type 2.

  • Type 1 diabetes mellitus used to be called insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, or juvenile-onset diabetes mellitus, because it usually begins in childhood or adolescence.
  • In type 1 diabetes mellitus, the pancreas releases no insulin at all because the body has destroyed the cells that produce it (islet cells). The patient therefore relies on treatment with insulin.
  • Type 2 diabetes mellitus is the most common form of diabetes. It used to be called non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, or adult onset diabetes because it usually begins in adulthood.
  • In type 2 diabetes, patients can still produce insulin, but they do not produce enough and/or their bodies cannot use it properly.

Another form of diabetes, known as gestational diabetes, occurs in some women during pregnancy. It is a temporary condition caused by pregnancy and usually occurs in the later stages, once the baby has formed but is still growing.

 

About Diabetes

Wednesday, August 16th, 2006

About DiabetesDiabetes mellitus, commonly referred to as diabetes, is a medical condition associated with abnormally high levels of glucose (or sugar) in the blood (hyperglycaemia).

  • Glucose is a type of sugar found in certain foods such as honey and some, but not all, fruits. It is also the form of sugar that all sugary and starchy foods are converted to in the body after digestion. Glucose is used by the body to make energy.
  • Normally, blood glucose levels are tightly controlled by insulin, a chemical signalling substance (hormone) that is produced by a gland near your stomach called the pancreas.
  • Insulin lowers the blood glucose level because it stimulates the body to make use of glucose.
  • When the amount of glucose in the blood increases, for example, after eating food, insulin is released from the pancreas to normalise the glucose level. However, in patients with diabetes mellitus, the elevated glucose levels cannot be normalised. This causes abnormally high levels of blood glucose, which ultimately leads to the presence of glucose in the urine (glucosuria).