Archive for the ‘Lung cancer’ Category

Best Remedies For Lung Infection

Monday, September 16th, 2013

The lungs are a vital part of the respiratory system and are absolutely essential for inhalation and exhalation of air in the human body. The process of breathing enriches the quality and the flow of blood, enhancing the manner in which all the bodily organs function. Normal body temperature varies from person to person, but in general, is 98.6. Having a fever is one sign that you may have a lung infection.

When we become ill or the respiratory system becomes irritated, this chest mucus, or phlegm is produced in larger amounts and the immunoglobulins work hard to fight off invading or foreign bodies.

Several other conditions can also produce chest mucus and subsequent other symptoms. Post nasal drip (PND), classified as the backward flow of mucus draining from the sinus cavities down the throat. The constant dripping associated with post nasal drip typically causes irritation and congestion, and may be accompanied by consistent urges to clear your throat and blow your nose. Irritants, dairy, dry climates, smoking, colds, flu and pregnancy may cause post nasal drip.

Some of the main causes of lung infections or respiratory diseases are pleurisy, pneumonia, cough, common cold, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. At times, people could suffer from bacterial lung infections, due to environmental or even occupational factors, which include long term exposure to toxins and air pollutants.

Many patients complain about having an increased amount of mucus when they have COPD. When a lung infection is present, however, mucus production not only increases in amount, but generally gets thicker and stickier, and changes in color. It can also have a foul odor to it.

Treatment For Lung Cancer

Friday, April 2nd, 2010

Alternative therapies should complement conventional treatment, not replace it. Before participating in any alternative treatment programs, patients should consult their doctors concerning the appropriateness and the role of such programs in overall cancer treatment plans. Appropriate alternative treatments can help prolong a patient’s life or at least improve quality of life, prevent recurrence of tumors, or prolong the remission period and reduce adverse reactions to chemotherapy and radiation.

The use of beta-carotene and vitamin A supplements in lung cancer patients is controversial. Vitamin A and beta-carotene were advocated as antioxidants with lung-protective effects that may decrease the risk of lung cancer. However, recent studies suggest that betacarotene supplements may have no demonstrated effect in smokers and no effects on nonsmokers. Therefore, use of beta-carotene supplement in lung cancer patients or as preventive measure in smokers is not recommended at the present time. However, researchers believe that patients benefit from nature’s source of beta-carotene and vitamin A. Beta-carotene in food carries all the benefits, yet does not have the harmful effects controversial high-dose supplements may carry.

The effectiveness of many of the anticancer drugs used to treat lung cancer can be reduced when patients take megadoses of antioxidants. These antioxidants in patients not undergoing chemotherapy can be helpful in protecting the body against cancer. However, taken during chemotherapy, these antioxidants protect the cancer cells from being killed by chemotherapy drugs. Because high-dose supplementation of antioxidants can interfere with conventional chemotherapy treatment, patients should check with their physicians concerning dosage and recommended daily allowance (RDA) during chemotherapy or radiation therapy.

Lung cancer – when should one consult a doctor

Friday, August 11th, 2006

One should consult a health care provider if they develop the symptoms associated with lung cancer, in particular, if they have:

  • A new persistent cough or worsening of an existing chronic cough
  • Blood in your sputum
  • Persistent bronchitis or repeated respiratory infections
  • Chest pain
  • Unexplained weight loss and/or fatigue
  • Breathing difficulties such as shortness of breath or wheezing

Lung Cancer: Who’s at Risk?

Friday, August 11th, 2006

 

Researchers have discovered several causes of lung cancer — most are related to the use of tobacco.

  • Cigarettes. Smoking cigarettes causes lung cancer. Harmful substances, called carcinogens, in tobacco damage the cells in the lungs. Over time, the damaged cells may become cancerous. The likelihood that a smoker will develop lung cancer is affected by the age at which smoking began, how long the person has smoked, the number of cigarettes smoked per day, and how deeply the smoker inhales. Stopping smoking greatly reduces a person’s risk for developing lung cancer.
  • Cigars and Pipes. Cigar and pipe smokers have a higher risk of lung cancer than nonsmokers. The number of years a person smokes, the number of pipes or cigars smoked per day, and how deeply the person inhales all affect the risk of developing lung cancer. Even cigar and pipe smokers who do not inhale are at increased risk for lung, mouth, and other types of cancer.
  • Environmental Tobacco Smoke. The chance of developing lung cancer is increased by exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) — the smoke in the air when someone else smokes. Exposure to ETS, or secondhand smoke, is called involuntary or passive smoking.
  • Radon. Radon is an invisible, odorless, and tasteless radioactive gas that occurs naturally in soil and rocks. It can cause damage to the lungs that may lead to lung cancer. People who work in mines may be exposed to radon and, in some parts of the country, radon is found in houses. Smoking increases the risk of lung cancer even more for those already at risk because of exposure to radon. A kit available at most hardware stores allows homeowners to measure radon levels in their homes. The home radon test is relatively easy to use and inexpensive. Once a radon problem is corrected, the hazard is gone for good.
  • Asbestos. Asbestos is the name of a group of minerals that occur naturally as fibers and are used in certain industries. Asbestos fibers tend to break easily into particles that can float in the air and stick to clothes. When the particles are inhaled, they can lodge in the lungs, damaging cells and increasing the risk for lung cancer. Studies have shown that workers who have been exposed to large amounts of asbestos have a risk of developing lung cancer that is 3 to 4 times greater than that for workers who have not been exposed to asbestos. This exposure has been observed in such industries as shipbuilding, asbestos mining and manufacturing, insulation work, and brake repair. The risk of lung cancer is even higher among asbestos workers who also smoke. Asbestos workers should use the protective equipment provided by their employers and follow recommended work practices and safety procedures.
  • Pollution. Researchers have found a link between lung cancer and exposure to certain air pollutants, such as by-products of the combustion of diesel and other fossil fuels. However, this relationship has not been clearly defined, and more research is being done.
  • Lung Diseases. Certain lung diseases, such as tuberculosis (TB), increase a person’s chance of developing lung cancer. Lung cancer tends to develop in areas of the lung that are scarred from TB.
  • Personal History. A person who has had lung cancer once is more likely to develop a second lung cancer compared with a person who has never had lung cancer. Quitting smoking after lung cancer is diagnosed may prevent the development of a second lung cancer.

Researchers continue to study the causes of lung cancer and to search for ways to prevent it. We already know that the best way to prevent lung cancer is to quit (or never start) smoking. The sooner a person quits smoking the better. Even if you have been smoking for many years, it’s never too late to benefit from quitting.

The best way to prevent lung cancer is to quit, or never start, smoking.

source & courtesy: National Cancer Institute | cancer.gov

Lung cancer

Friday, August 11th, 2006

Lung CancerThe key symptom of lung cancer is a persistent cough that gradually gets worse.

Other symptoms include:

  • shortness of breath
  • drop in ability to exercise
  • persistent chest pain
  • persistent cough or coughing up blood
  • loss of appetite, weight loss and general fatigue

At present there is no effective screening test for lung cancer.

If you are worried that you have lung cancer, your doctor may order a chest X-ray, which allows doctors to look out for shadowy areas on the lungs.

Sometimes a more detailed series of x-rays, called a CT scan, is ordered.

In many cases, this will be followed by a bronchoscopy or mediastinoscopy, which means that a thin flexible telescope is put down the airways of your lungs, after which a biopsy of any suspicious area is performed.