Archive for the ‘Healthcare’ Category

4 Natural Home Remedies for Prickly Heat

Tuesday, June 14th, 2016

1. Yoghurt - Yoghurt has been known to have both, a cooling and soothing effect on the skin. Apply cold yoghurt to the affected areas and leave it on for 15minutes. Wash with cold water and pat dry. Never rub the irritated skin.

2. Rose Water - Make a concoction using the following ingredient: 200ml rose water, 4 Tbsp honey and 200ml pure water. Mix together and freeze in an ice tray. Take these ice cubes, four to five at a time, and wrap them in a soft muslin cloth. Press the bundle gently on the prickly heat affected areas.

3. Sandalwood - This is a time teste remedy for prickly heat and I would recommend that you mix it with full fat, cold milk, and apply it as a pack on the skin and let it dry. Wash off with cold water.

4. Fuller’s Earth - Also known as multani mitti, it has cooling effects on the skin. I have tried this recipe on my young teenager when she returns from school and it is not only very effective but helps soothe and cool her skin instantly.Take 2 tsp mint paste, 3 Tbsp fuller’s earth and enough cold milk to make a smooth paste. Apply this on the skin and let it dry. It is preferable that you sit under a fan whenever you are doing these treatments and always pat dry the skin with a very soft towel.

How to Prevent Prickly Heat

Monday, June 13th, 2016

1. Air Yourself

Firstly, the golden rule is to keep the body cool and well aired. If you can, uncover the skin where you are experiencing prickly heat and expose it to cool air. Doing so will help bring relief to the skin. For babies, avoid making them wear diapers and air the affected areas.

2. Say No to Synthetic

Summer is the time when you should wear light coloured and loose clothes so that there is air circulation and your body stays cool. Wear cotton clothing and avoid synthetic tight clothes at all cost.

3. Drink Up Those Summer Coolers

Because the hot temperature can drain energy out of you, it is important to consistently hydrate yourself to stay cool. Drink cool natural drinks like chaach, lemon water andcoconut water, and avoid alcohol and aerated drinks. You can also add flavoured water to your diet, where you can make the most of seasonal fruits and herbs.

4. Eat Healthy Foods

Beat the heat and stay cool by eating healthy. Include lots of fresh raw foods like saladsand fruits and avoid heavy greasy dishes, fried foods and sweets.

5. Keep Your Skin Dry

Never leave the skin damp during this hot season. In fact after bathing, always pat yourself dry with a towel to avoid bacteria from building up. Powder yourself and ensure that your skin stays cool.

Sand Fly Bites

Saturday, June 11th, 2016

The Sand Fly

Sand flies are about 1/8 of an inch long, and have hairy, brownish-gray wings, which they hold above their bodies in a “V” shape. In the U.S., they are found primarily in the southern states. They breed in places with a lot of moisture, such as decaying plants, moss, and mud. The larvae look like worms. They are most active between dusk and dawn. Sand flies eat nectar and sap, but females also feed on the blood of animals and humans. They live mainly in tropical and subtropical climates.

Sand Fly Bites

Sand flies are tiny and quiet, so you may not notice them before they bite. The bite can be painful and may cause red bumps and blisters. Sand flies transmit diseases to animals and humans, including a parasitic disease called leishmaniasis.

Fleabites bite

Friday, June 10th, 2016

What do fleabites look like?

Fleabites are pretty distinctive. They remain small, unlike mosquito bites. If a flea bites you, you may see one or more of the following:

  • bites that appear as small, red bumps
  • a red “halo” around the bite center
  • bites in groups of three or four, or in a straight line
  • bites that appear around the ankles or legs

Fleabites are also common around the waist, armpits, breasts, groin, or in the folds of the elbows and knees.

What are the symptoms of a fleabite?

Fleabites exhibit several common symptoms. They are very itchy, and the skin around each bite may become sore or painful. And you may experience hives or develop a rash near the site of a bite.

Additionally, excessive scratching can further damage the skin and a secondary bacterial infection can develop.

Avoid scratching if you can, and monitor your bite areas for signs of an infection, including white-topped blisters or a rash.

Can fleabites cause other problems?

For humans, the risk of contracting another disease from the flea is very, very small. That’s not true for your pets, however.

It’s important to take them to a vet if they have fleas.

How are fleabites treated?

Fleabites will go away without treatment. However, in order to stop being bitten you have to stop the fleas.

Your pet and your home will need to be treated with pesticides to kill the fleas. Professional pest control experts should administer these treatments.

In most cases, you will need to leave your home for several hours after the treatment has been deployed.

Do-it-yourself home treatments are available for fleas, but if they do not work, you may need to seek professional help.

To relieve the symptoms of fleabites, try over-the-counter anti-itch creams and antihistamine medications.

Avoid scratching the area. If you notice signs of an infection at the bite site, such as a white pocket or rash, make an appointment to see your doctor.

Potential Risks of Crash Diets

Wednesday, June 8th, 2016
  • Slowing down of the metabolism
  • Loss of muscle, leading to further decline of metabolism
  • Weight gain after the crash diet,sometimes gaining more weight than was lost due to slower metabolism
  • Weakening of the bones potentially leading to osteoporosis
  • Deprivation of essential nutrients
  • Weakening of your immune system
  • Cardiac stress
  • Heart palpitations

The 14 Crash Diets That Work

Tuesday, June 7th, 2016

1. Juice Fast Crash Diet – Fat, Sick and Nearly Dead

2. Cabbage Soup Diet

3. 3-day Diet

4. The Master Cleanse

5. Xtreme Fat Loss Diet

6. Grapefruit Diet

7. Hollywood Diet

8. 7 day all you can eat diet

9. Clean Program

10. 4-day Diet

11. Chicken Soup Diet

12. Fat Loss 4 Idiots (Idiot Proof Diet)

13. Dr. Joel Fuhrman’s 7-Day Crash Diet (Approved by Dr. Oz)

14. Kellogg’s Special K Diet

 

Do Crash Diets Work?

Monday, June 6th, 2016

It depends what your goal is. If you goal is to lose a specific amount of weight by a certain target date, crash DIETS can be very effective. They are not easy to implement, as most of them are very monotone and severely restrict the calorie intake. Also depriving your body of so many calories and valuable nutrition puts a lot of stress on your body.

If your goal is long term WEIGHT LOSS, crash DIETS are less effective. It is the dreaded yo-yo effect. Since you restrict the calorie intake so much your body will go into survival mode, and reduce the calories it burns during normal daily activity. When eventually you start eating normally, it is very easy to now add the pounds back on, since your body is now (at least for a time) burning less calories than it used to, prior to the crash diet.

But, people are successful, short term and long term with crash diets. Just keep in mind that crash diets put stress on your body, are not comfortable to implement (you can’t eat much), and you need to be careful to not gain it all back once you start eating normal

6 Diet Tips for Youthful Skin

Monday, May 30th, 2016

Cut out the sugar: The less sugar we eat, the better it is. Many natural sweeteners like honey and agave syrup are high in fructose and should also be avoided as should sugary fruits (tropical fruits are the worst), fruit juice and dried fruit. Artificial sweeteners such as aspartame should be strictly avoided. Not only are they nasty chemical substances, but they have also been connected to obesity and diabetes.

- Eat more healthy fat: One of the crucial things our body and our skin needs for long-term health is fat. Studies have shown that eating more fat makes our skin more elastic and less wrinkly. The increase in fat consumption has to be done in conjunction with sugar and grain reduction. Monounsaturated fats such as olive oil, avocado and macadamia nut oil are well-known to be good for us.

- Greatly reduce your grain and starch intake: Most people believe that a diet rich in grains is good for health; whole grains in particular are touted as especially healthy. But starches, the carbohydrates in grains, are simply long strings of sugar molecules and eating them will still make our skin and body age prematurely.

- Eat lots of vegetables: Vegetables will also provide you with plenty of fibre and antioxidants. However, make sure to cut down on starchy vegetables, as they can have a surprisingly strong effect on our blood sugar level. For example roast parsnips can bring up our blood sugar more than pure table sugar. Good fruit options are berries, as they are relatively low in sugar and high in antioxidants.

- Don’t forget your daily protein: Protein provides important building blocks for our entire body. However, our body has little capacity to store protein. So, to supply our body and skin with all it needs, we have to provide it with sufficient amounts of protein on a daily basis.

- Spice up your life: Herbs and spices including rosemary, garlic, curcumin and cinnamon are a great addition to any skin health and longevity eating plan. Not only do spices greatly add flavour and variety of our food, but they also contain bioactive substances with positive effects on general health, skin and life span.

Nutmeg nutrition facts

Saturday, May 21st, 2016

Health benefits of nutmeg

  • Nutmeg and mace spice contains many plant-derived chemical compounds that are known to have been anti-oxidant, disease preventing, and health promoting properties.
  • The spicy nut contains fixed oil trimyristin and many essential volatile oils such as which gives a sweet aromatic flavor to nutmeg such as myristicin, elemicin, eugenol and safrole. The other volatile-oils are pinene, camphene, dipentene, cineole, linalool, sabinene, safrole, terpeniol.
  • The active principles in nutmeg have many therapeutic applications in many traditional medicines as anti-fungal, anti-depressant, aphrodisiac, digestive, and carminative functions.
  • This spice is a good source of minerals like copper, potassium, calcium, manganese, iron, zinc and magnesium. Potassium is an important component of cell and body fluids that helps control heart rate and blood pressure. Manganese and copper are used by the body as co-factors for the antioxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase. Iron is essential for red blood cell production and as a co-factor for cytochrome oxidases enzymes.
  • It is also rich in many vital B-complex vitamins, including vitamin C, folic acid, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin A and many flavonoid anti-oxidants like beta-carotene and cryptoxanthin that are essential for optimum health.

Mustard seeds nutrition facts

Friday, May 20th, 2016

Health benefits of mustard seeds

  • Generally perceived as health benefiting spice, mustard seeds are indeed very rich in phyto-nutrients, minerals, vitamins and anti-oxidants.
  • Being one of the chief oil seeds, mustards are indeed very high in calories; 100 g of seeds provide 508 calories. Nonetheless, the seeds are made of quality proteins, essential oils, vitamins, minerals, and dietary fiber.
  • The seeds are high in essential oils as well as plant sterols. Some of important sterols include such as brassicasterol, campesterol, sitosterol, avenasterol and stigmasterol. Some of glucosinolate and fatty acids in the seeds include sinigrin, myrosin, erucic, eicosenoic, oleic, and palmitic acids.
  • Mustard seeds are an excellent source of essential B-complex vitamins such as folates, niacin, thiamin, riboflavin, pyridoxine (vitaminB-6), pantothenic acid. These vitamins are essential in the sense that body requires them from external sources to replenish. These B-complex groups of vitamins help in enzyme synthesis, nervous system function and regulating body metabolism.
  • 100 g of mustards provide 4.733 mg of niacin (vitamin B-3). Niacin is a part of nicotinamide co-enzymes that help lower blood cholesterol and triglyceride levels.
  • Mustard seeds contain flavonoid and carotenoid antioxidants such as carotenes, zea-xanthin, and lutein. In addition, the seeds compose a small amount of vitamin anti-oxidants such as vitamin A, C, and vitamin K.
  • The seeds are an excellent source of vitamin E, gamma tocopherol; contain about 19.82 mg per 100 g (about 132% of RDA). Vitamin E is a powerful lipid soluble antioxidant, required for maintaining the integrity of cell membrane of mucus membranes and skin by protecting it from harmful oxygen-free radicals.
  • Mustards are rich source of health benefiting minerals. Calcium, manganese, copper, iron, selenium and zinc are some of the minerals especially concentrated in these seeds. Calcium helps build bone and teeth. Manganese is employed by the body as a co-factor for the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase. Copper is required in the production of red blood cells. Iron is required for the red blood cell formation and cellular metabolism.

Mace spice nutrition facts

Thursday, May 19th, 2016

Health benefits of mace spice

  • Essentially employed as an aromatic agent, mace spice greatly enhances color, taste and flavor of foods. Nonetheless, it contains some of the anti-oxidant compounds, essential oils, minerals, and vitamins.
  • Mace features quite a different nutritional profile than nutmeg. It is less in calories, but has more concentrations of essential oils, vitamin A, vitamin C, carotenes, iron, calcium,
  • The spice contains fixed oil trimyristine, and many essential volatile oils, which gives a sweet aromatic flavor such as myristicin, elemicin, eugenol and safrole. These oils occur in higher concentration in mace than in nutmeg. The other less important volatile-oils are pinene, camphene, dipentene, cineole, linalool, sabinene, safrole, terpeniol.
  • The active principles in mace spice have many therapeutic applications in many traditional medicines as anti-fungal, anti-depressant, aphrodisiac, digestive, and carminative functions.
  • Mace has more vitamin-C content than nutmeg. 100 g mace spice has 21 mg against just 3 mg of nutmegs. Likewise, mace blades contain more riboflavin (vitamin B-2).
  • Mace arils are rather excellent sources of vitamin-A. 100 g of mace provides 800 IU vitamin A, nearly nine times more compared to that in nutmeg.
  • Mace arils contain more calcium, copper, iron and magnesium than nutmeg. 100 g of mace powder has 13.90 mg of iron when compared to just 3.04 mg of nutmeg. Manganese and copper are utilized by the human body as co-factors for the antioxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase. Iron is essential for red blood cell production and as a co-factor for cytochrome oxidases enzymes.

Health benefits of mace spice

  • Essentially employed as an aromatic agent, mace spice greatly enhances color, taste and flavor of foods. Nonetheless, it contains some of the anti-oxidant compounds, essential oils, minerals, and vitamins.
  • Mace features quite a different nutritional profile than nutmeg. It is less in calories, but has more concentrations of essential oils, vitamin A, vitamin C, carotenes, iron, calcium,
  • The spice contains fixed oil trimyristine, and many essential volatile oils, which gives a sweet aromatic flavor such as myristicin, elemicin, eugenol and safrole. These oils occur in higher concentration in mace than in nutmeg. The other less important volatile-oils are pinene, camphene, dipentene, cineole, linalool, sabinene, safrole, terpeniol.
  • The active principles in mace spice have many therapeutic applications in many traditional medicines as anti-fungal, anti-depressant, aphrodisiac, digestive, and carminative functions.
  • Mace has more vitamin-C content than nutmeg. 100 g mace spice has 21 mg against just 3 mg of nutmegs. Likewise, mace blades contain more riboflavin (vitamin B-2).
  • Mace arils are rather excellent sources of vitamin-A. 100 g of mace provides 800 IU vitamin A, nearly nine times more compared to that in nutmeg.
  • Mace arils contain more calcium, copper, iron and magnesium than nutmeg. 100 g of mace powder has 13.90 mg of iron when compared to just 3.04 mg of nutmeg. Manganese and copper are utilized by the human body as co-factors for the antioxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase. Iron is essential for red blood cell production and as a co-factor for cytochrome oxidases enzymes.

Jalapeno peppers nutrition facts

Wednesday, May 18th, 2016

Health benefits of jalapeno peppers

  • Chilies contain health benefiting alkaloid compound, capsaicin, which gives them strong spicy pungent character. Tolerance level of peppers in human beings, including jalapeno peppers, may have wide individual variations. Wherever feasible, they should be consumed in moderation to avoid any untoward experiences. Nonetheless, they packed with an impressive list of phto-chemical compounds that are known to have disease preventing and health promoting properties.
  • Capsaicin has been found to have anti-bacterial, anti-carcinogenic, analgesic, and anti-diabetic properties, at least in some early laboratory studies on experimental mammals. It also found to reduce LDL-cholesterol levels in obese individuals.
  • Fresh jalapeno peppers are rich source of vitamin-C. Ripe fruits have more of this vitamin than raw greens. 100 g provide about 118.6 µg or about 198% of RDA. Vitamin C is a potent water-soluble antioxidant. It is required for the collagen synthesis within the body. Collagen is the main structural protein required for maintaining the integrity of blood vessels, skin, tissues, organs, and bones. Regular consumption of foods rich in vitamin C helps the body protect from scurvy; develop resistance against infectious agents (boosts immunity) and scavenge harmful, pro-inflammatory free-radicals from the body.
  • Furthermore, they contain other valuable antioxidants such as vitamin A, and flavonoids like beta-carotene, alpha-carotene, lutein, zea xanthin, and cryptoxanthin. These antioxidant substances in capsicum help to protect the body from injurious effects of free-radicals generated from stress and disease conditions.
  • Jalapeno chillies characteristically contain more pyridoxine, vitamin E, vitamin K than other varieties of peppers. Vitamin K increases bone mass by promoting osteotrophic activity in the bones. It also has the beneficial effect in Alzheimer’s disease patients by limiting neuronal damage in their brain.

Horseradish nutrition facts

Tuesday, May 17th, 2016

Health benefits of horseradish

  • Horseradish is low in calories and fat. However, it contains good amounts of dietary fiber, vitamins, minerals, and anti-oxidants. Certain active principles in it found to have been anti-inflammatory, diuretic (increase urine output), and nerve soothing effects.
  • The root contains many volatile phyto-chemical compounds, which give its much-famed biting character. Some of the major constituents in the root are allyl isothiocyanate, 3-butenyl isothiocyanate, 2-propenylglucosinlate (sinigrin), 2-pentyl isothiocyanate, and phenylethyl isothiocyanate. It has been found that these compounds have been known to carry anti-oxidant and detoxification functions.
  • Some of the volatile phyto-chemical compounds in the root stimulate secretion of salivary, gastric, and intestinal digestive enzymes, and thereby facilitate digestion. It thus, works as a potent gastric stimulant which increases appetite.
  • Horseradish has good amounts of vitamin-C, which is a powerful water soluble anti-oxidant. 100 g fresh root holds 29 mg or 41% of daily-recommended values. Vitamin-C helps alleviate viral infections by boosting immunity. In addition, it helps remove harmful free-radicals from the body and may help protect it from cancers, inflammation, infections, etc.
  • This root-spice has some of vital minerals in moderation like sodium, potassium, manganese, iron, copper, zinc, and magnesium. Iron is an important co-factor for cytochrome-oxidase enzymes during cellular metabolism. It is also required for red blood cell production in the bone marrow. Being an important component of cell and body fluids, potassium helps control heart rate and blood pressure. Manganese is used by the body as a co-factor for the powerful antioxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase.
  • In addition, the root has small amounts of essential vitamins such as folate, vitamin B-6 (pyridoxine), riboflavin, niacin, and pantothenic acid.

Fenugreek seeds nutrition facts

Monday, May 16th, 2016

Health benefits of fenugreek seeds

  • Fenugreek seeds are rich source of minerals, vitamins, and phytonutrients. 100 g seeds carry 323 calories.
  • The seeds compose ample amounts of soluble dietary fiber. Soaking them in water softens their outer coat and turns it slimy (mucilaginous). 100 g of seeds provide am 24.6 g or over 65% of dietary fiber.
  • Non-starch polysaccharides (NSP) constitute major portion of this fiber content in the fenugreek seeds. Some important NSP’s include saponins, hemicellulose, mucilage, tannin, and pectin. These compounds help lower blood LDL-cholesterol levels by inhibiting bile salts re-absorption in the colon. They also bind to toxins in the food and help to protect the colon mucusa from cancers.
  • NSPs (non-starch polysaccharides) increase the bulk of the food and speed up bowel movements. Altogether, NSPs assist in smooth digestion and help relieve constipation ailments.
  • It has been established that amino-acid 4-hydroxy isoleucine in the fenugreek seeds has facilitator action on insulin secretion. In addition, fiber in the seeds helps lower rate of glucose absorption in the intestines, and thus help regulate blood sugar levels. Fenugreek seeds are therefore one of the recommendeded food ingredients in the diabetic diet.
  • The seeds contain many phytochemical compounds such as choline, trigonelline diosgenin, yamogenin, gitogenin, tigogenin and neotigogens. Together, these compounds attribute for the medicinal properties of fenugreeks.
  • This prized spice is an excellent sources of minerals like copper, potassium, calcium, iron, selenium, zinc, manganese, and magnesium. Potassium is an important component of cell and body fluids that helps control heart rate and blood pressure by countering action on sodium. Iron is essential for red blood cell production and as a co-factor for cytochrome-oxidases enzymes.
  • It is also rich in many vital vitamins that are essential nutrients for optimum health, including thiamin, pyridoxine (vitamin B6), folic acid, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin A, and vitamin-C.

Fennel seed nutrition facts

Saturday, May 14th, 2016

Health benefits of fennel seeds

  • Fennel symbolizes longevity, courage, and strength. In addition to its use as medicinal values, fennel has many health benefiting nutrients, essential compounds, anti-oxidants, dietary fiber, minerals, and vitamins.
  • Fennel seeds indeed contain numerous flavonoid anti-oxidants like kaempferol and quercetin. These compounds function as powerful anti-oxidants by removing harmful free radicals from the body thus offer protection from cancers, infection, aging and degenerative neurological diseases.
  • Like in caraway, fennel seeds too are rich source of dietary fiber. 100 g seeds provide 39.8 g of fiber. Much of this roughage is metabolically inert insoluble fiber, which helps increase bulk of the food by absorbing water throughout the digestive system and easing constipation prolems.
  • In addition, dietary fibers bind to bile salts (produced from cholesterol) and decrease their re-absorption in colon. It thus helps lower serum LDL cholesterol levels. Together with flavonoid anti-oxidants, fiber composition of fennel helps protect the colon mucusa from cancers.
  • Fennel seeds compose of health benefiting volatile essential oil compounds such as anethole, limonene, anisic aldehyde, pinene, myrcene, fenchone, chavicol, and cineole. These active principles in the fennel are known to have antioxidant, digestive, carminative, and anti-flatulent properties.
  • Fennel seeds are concentrated source of minerals like copper, iron, calcium, potassium, manganese, selenium, zinc, and magnesium. Copper is required in the production of red blood cells. Iron is required for red blood cell formation. Zinc is a co-factor in many enzymes that regulate growth and development, sperm generation, digestion and nucleic acid synthesis. Potassium is an important component of cell and body fluids that helps controlling heart rate and blood pressure. Manganese is used by the body as a co-factor for the powerful anti-oxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase.
  • Furthermore, fennel seeds indeed are the storehouse for many vital vitamins. Vitamin A, vitamin E, vitamin C as well as many B-complex vitamins like thiamin, pyridoxine, riboflavin and niacin particularly are concentrated in these seeds.

Cumin seeds nutrition facts

Friday, May 13th, 2016

Health benefits of cumin seeds

  • Cumin seeds contain numerous phyto-chemicals that are known to have antioxidant, carminative and anti-flatulent properties. The seeds are an excellent source of dietary fiber.
  • Its seeds contain certain health-benefiting essential oils such as cuminaldehyde (4-isopropylbenzaldehyde), pyrazines, 2-methoxy-3-sec-butylpyrazine, 2-ethoxy-3-isopropylpyrazine, and 2-methoxy-3-methylpyrazine.
  • The active principles in the cumin may improve gut motility and help in digestion by augmenting gastro-intestinal enzyme secretions.
  • The spice is an excellent sources of minerals like iron, copper, calcium, potassium, manganese, selenium, zinc and magnesium. Copper is required in the production of red blood cells. Iron is required for red blood cell formation. Zinc is a co-factor in many enzymes that regulate growth and development, digestion and nucleic acid synthesis. Potassium is an important component of cell and body fluids that helps controlling heart rate and blood pressure. Manganese is used by the body as a co-factor for the powerful anti-oxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase.
  • It also contains very good amounts of B-complex vitamins such as thiamin, vitamin B-6, niacin, riboflavin, and other vital anti-oxidant vitamins like vitamin E, vitamin A, and vitamin C.
  • The seeds are also rich source of many flavonoid phenolic anti-oxidants such as carotenes, zea-xanthin, and lutein.

Coriander seeds nutrition facts

Thursday, May 12th, 2016

Health benefits of coriander seeds

  • Coriander seeds possess many plant-derived chemical compounds that known to have been anti-oxidant, disease preventing, and health promoting properties.
  • The characteristic aromatic flavor of coriander seeds comes from their essential volatile oils and fatty acids. Some important fatty acids in the dried seeds include petroselinic acid, linoleic acid (omega 6), oleic acid, and palmitic acid. In addition, the seeds contain essential oils such as linalool (68%), a-pinene (10%), geraniol, camphene, terpine etc. Together; these active principles are responsible for digestive, carminative, and anti-flatulent properties of the seeds.
  • As in other spices, coriander is also rich in dietary fiber. 100 g seeds provide 41.9 g of fiber. Much of this fiber is metabolically inert insoluble fiber, which helps increase bulk of the food by absorbing water throughout the digestive system and help easing constipation condition.
  • In addition, dietary fibers bind to bile salts (produced from cholesterol) and decrease their re-absorption in colon, thus help lower serum LDL cholesterol levels. Together with flavonoid anti-oxidants, fiber composition of coriander helps protect colon mucusa from cancers.
  • Its seeds are an excellent source of minerals like iron, copper, calcium, potassium, manganese, zinc and magnesium. Copper is required for the production of red blood cells. Iron is essential for cell metabolism and red blood cell formation. Zinc is a co-factor in many enzymes that regulate growth and development, sperm generation, digestion and nucleic acid synthesis. Potassium is an important component of cell and body fluids that helps controlling heart rate and blood pressure. Manganese is utilized by the body as a co-factor for the powerful anti-oxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase.
  • Unlike other dry spice seeds that lack in vitamin C, coriander seeds contain an ample amount of this anti-oxidant vitamin. 100 g of dry seeds provide 21 mg or 35% of RDI of vitamin-C.
  • Furthermore, the seeds are the storehouse of many vital B-complex vitamins like thiamin, riboflavin, and niacin.

Cloves nutrition facts

Wednesday, May 11th, 2016

Medicinal properties and health benefits of cloves

  • The active principles in the clove are known to have antioxidant, anti-septic, local anesthetic, anti-inflammatory, rubefacient (warming and soothing), carminative and anti-flatulent properties.
  • The spice contains health benefiting essential oils such as eugenol. It is a phenyl-propanoids class of chemical compound which gives pleasant, sweet aromatic fragrances to the clove-bud. Eugenol has local anesthetic and antiseptic properties, hence; useful in dental care essentials as well as in treatment procedures.
  • The other important constituents in this spice include:

    essential oils: acetyl eugenol, beta-caryophyllene and vanillin, crategolic acid;

    tannins: gallotannic acid, methyl salicylate (painkiller);

    the flavonoids: eugenin, kaempferol, rhamnetin, and eugenitin;

    triterpenoids: such as oleanolic acid, stigmasterol and campesterol

    and several sesquiterpenes.

  • The active principles in the clove may increase gut motility as well as improve the digestion power through increasing gastro-intestinal enzyme secretions. Thus, helps relieve indigestion and constipation problems.
  • The spice also contains a good amount of minerals like potassium, manganese, iron, selenium and magnesium. Potassium is an important electrolyte of cell and body fluids that helps control heart rate and blood pressure. Manganese is used by the body as a co-factor for the antioxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase.
  • Further, the spice buds contain very good amounts of vitamin A and beta-carotene levels. These compounds are known to have antioxidant properties. Vitamin A is also required by the body for maintaining healthy mucus membranes and skin in addition to essential for vision. Consumption of natural foods rich in flavonoids helps to protect the body from lung and oral cavity cancers.
  • Additionally, this spice is a good source of vitamin-K, vitamin-B6 (pyridoxine), thiamin (vitamin B-1), vitamin-C and riboflavin. Consumption of foods rich in vitamin C helps the body develop resistance against infectious agents and scavenge harmful oxygen-free radicals.

Cinnamon spice nutrition facts

Tuesday, May 10th, 2016

Health benefits of cinnamon

  • The active principles in the cinnamon spice known to have anti-oxidant, anti-diabetic, anti-septic, local anesthetic, anti-inflammatory, rubefacient (warming and soothing), carminative and anti-flatulent properties.
  • Cinnamon spice has the highest anti-oxidant strength of all the food sources in nature. The total measured ORAC (Oxygen radical absorbance capacity) value for this novel spice is 2,67,536 trolex equivalents (TE), which is many hundred times more than in  chokeberry, apples, etc.
  • The spice contains health benefiting essential oils such as eugenol, a phenylpropanoids class of chemical compound that gives pleasant, sweet aromatic fragrance to it. Eugenol has got local anesthetic and antiseptic properties, hence; employed in the dental and gum treatment procedures.
  • Other important essential oils in cinnamon include ethyl cinnamate, linalool, cinnamaldehyde, beta-caryophyllene, and methyl chavicol.
  • Cinnamaldehyde in cinnamon-sticks has been found to have anti-coagulnt (prevents blood-lotting) function, prevents platelet clogging inside the blood vessels, and thereby helps prevent stroke, peripheral arterial and coronary artery diseases.
  • The active principles in this spice increase the motility of the intestinal tract and help in digestion by increasing gastro-intestinal enzyme secretions.
  • This spicy stick is an excellent source of minerals like potassium, calcium, manganese, iron, zinc, and magnesium. Iron is required for cellular metabolism as a co-factor and in RBC’s production. Potassium is an important component of cell and body fluids that helps control heart rate and blood pressure. Manganese and copper are chiefly used by the body as co-factors for the antioxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase.
  • It also contains very good amounts of vitamin A, niacin, pantothenic acid, and pyridoxine.
  • Further, it is also a very good source of flavonoid phenolic anti-oxidants such as carotenes, zea-xanthin, lutein and cryptoxanthin.