Archive for February, 2010

Swine Flu

Saturday, February 27th, 2010

Swine Influenza (swine flu) is a respiratory disease of pigs caused by type A influenza virus that regularly causes outbreaks of influenza in pigs. Swine flu viruses cause high levels of illness and low death rates in pigs. Swine influenza viruses may circulate among swine throughout the year, but most outbreaks occur during the late fall and winter months similar to outbreaks in humans.

The symptoms of swine flu in people are expected to be similar to the symptoms of regular human seasonal influenza and include fever, lethargy, lack of appetite and coughing. Some people with swine flu also have reported runny nose, sore throat, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. Symptoms of Swine flu may include all or some of the following:

  • Fever
  • Muscle aches
  • Lethargy
  • Coughing
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • Runny nose
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Lack of appetite
  • There are everyday actions people can take to stay healthy.

    * Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it.
    * Wash your hands often with soap and water, especially after you cough or sneeze. Alcohol-based hands cleaners are also effective.
    * Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth. Germs spread that way.
    * Try to avoid close contact with sick people.
    * Influenza is thought to spread mainly person-to-person through coughing or sneezing of infected people.
    * If you get sick, CDC recommends that you stay home from work or school and limit contact with others to keep from infecting them.

Chicken Pox

Monday, February 8th, 2010

Chicken pox is contagious for approximately seven days during a person’s period of infection. Contagiousness begins about two days before symptoms appear and continues until all blisters have formed scabs. Doctors recommend keeping the infected person isolated from others during those seven days.

Chicken Pox Sign and Symptoms

Typically, chicken pox begins with a low fever, headache, rash, and a general feeling of sickness, or malaise. The rash, which usually covers the face, scalp, and trunk of the body, starts as red bumps but quickly develops into small blisters. The rash and the blisters are extremely itchy. As the disease progresses, the blisters break open and form scabs, which fall off after about one to two weeks. The incubation period—the time between initial infection and the first appearance of symptoms—is approximately two weeks.

Chicken pox – TREATMENT & HOMEOPATHIC MEDICINES

Antim tart., Rhus tox, Kali mur., Pulsatilla, Aconite, Ars-alb, Apis, Belladona, Sulphur etc are known to work in cases of chickenpox.

Chicken pox – CONVENTIONAL TREATMENT

Treatment of chicken pox is usually limited to bed rest, acetaminophen for relief of fever and discomfort, and measures that soothe the itching, including lukewarm baths and application of topical medicines such as calamine lotion. Excessive scratching can cause infection of blisters, which can lead to scarring. Acyclovir, an antiviral drug, is used to treat severe cases of chicken pox, particularly in patients with a weakened immune system.

Causes of Low Blood Pressure or Hypotension

Monday, February 8th, 2010

Causes of low blood pressure due to low blood volume

Dehydration is common among patients with diarrhea who lose large amounts of water in their stool, particularly when drowsiness limits their drinking of fluids or is associated with nausea and vomiting. Dehydration also can occur with prolonged vomiting of any cause because of the loss of water in the vomitus. Other causes of dehydration include exercise, sweating, fever, and heat exhaustion or heat stroke. Individuals with mild dehydration may experience only thirst and dry mouth. Moderate to severe dehydration may cause orthostatic hypotension (manifest by light-headedness, dizziness or fainting upon standing). Protracted and severe dehydration can lead to shock, kidney failure, confusion, acidosis (too much acid in the blood), coma, and even death. For more, please read the Dehydration article.

Moderate or severe bleeding can quickly deplete an individual’s body of blood, leading to low blood pressure or orthostatic hypotension.

Severe inflammation of organs inside the body such as acute pancreatitis can cause low blood pressure. In acute pancreatitis, fluid leaves the blood to enter the inflamed tissues around the pancreas as well as the abdominal cavity, depleting the volume of blood.

Causes of low blood pressure due to heart disease

Weakened heart muscle can cause the heart to fail and reduce the amount of blood it pumps. One common cause of weakened heart muscle is the death of a large portion of the heart’s muscle due to a single, large heart attack or repeated smaller heart attacks. Other examples of conditions that can weaken the heart include medications that are toxic to the heart, infections of the muscle of the heart by viruses (myocarditis), and diseases of the heart’s valves such as aortic stenosis.

Pericarditis is an inflammation of the pericardium (the sac surrounding the heart). Pericarditis can cause fluid to accumulate within the pericardium and around the heart, restricting the ability of the heart to pump blood.

Pulmonary embolism is a condition in which a blood clot in a vein (a condition called deep vein thrombosis) breaks off and travels to the heart and eventually the lung. A large blood clot can block the flow of blood into the left ventricle from the lungs and severely diminish the ability of the heart to pump blood.

• A slow heart rate (bradycardia) can decrease the amount of blood pumped by the heart. The resting heart rate for a healthy adult is between 60 and 100 beats/minute. Bradycardia (resting heart rates slower than 60 beats/minute) does not always cause low blood pressure. But in many patients bradycardia can lead to low blood pressure, light-headedness, dizziness, and even fainting.

One example of bradycardia, sick sinus syndrome, occurs common in the elderly. This syndrome is due to degeneration of the sinus node (SA node), an area in the heart that generates electrical signals that cause the heart to beat regularly. In the sick sinus syndrome, the diseased SA node cannot generate signals fast enough to maintain a normal heart rate. Another condition that causes bradycardia is heart block. Electrical signals from the SA node must travel to the rest of the heart’s muscle to cause the heart to contract and pump blood. Normally these electrical signals are transmitted along special tissues in the heart. Heart block occurs when these specialized tissues are damaged by heart attacks, degeneration that occurs with aging, and medications. Heart block prevents some or all of the electrical signals generated by the SA node from reaching the rest of the heart, and this prevents the heart from contracting as rapidly as it otherwise would.

• An abnormally fast heart rate (tachycardia) also can cause low blood pressure. The most common example of tachycardia causing low blood pressure is atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation is a disorder of the heart characterized by rapid and irregular electrical discharges from the muscle of the heart (instead of the SA node), causing the ventricles to contract irregularly and (usually) rapidly. The rapidly contracting ventricles do not have enough time to fill maximally with blood before the each contraction, and the amount of blood that is pumped decreases, in spite of the faster heart rate.

Medications that cause low blood pressure

Autism

Monday, February 8th, 2010

Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) cover a wide range of behaviors and abilities. People who have ASDs, like all people, differ greatly in the way they act and what they can do. No two people with Autism will have the same symptoms. A symptom might be mild in one person and severe in another person. Some examples of the types of problems and behaviors a child or adult with an ASD might have follow.

Social skills: People with ASDs might not interact with others the way most people do, or they might not be interested in other people at all. People with ASDs might not make eye contact and might just want to be alone. They might have trouble understanding other people’s feelings or talking about their own feelings. Children with ASDs might not like to be held or cuddled, or might cuddle only when they want to. Some people with ASDs might not seem to notice when other people try to talk to them. Others might be very interested in people, but not know how to talk, play, or relate to them.

Speech, language, and communication: About 40% of children with ASDs do not talk at all. Others have echolalia, which is when they repeat back something that was said to them. The repeated words might be said right away or at a later time. For example, if you ask someone with an ASD, “Do you want some juice?” he or she will repeat “Do you want some juice?” instead of answering your question. Or a person might repeat a television ad heard sometime in the past. People with ASDs might not understand gestures such as waving goodbye. They might say “I” when they mean “you”, or vice versa. Their voices might sound flat and it might seem like they cannot control how loudly or softly they talk. People with ASDs might stand too close to the people they are talking to, or might stick with one topic of conversation for too long. Some people with ASDs can speak well and know a lot of words, but have a hard time listening to what other people say. They might talk a lot about something they really like, rather than have a back-and-forth conversation with someone.

Repeated behaviors and routines: People with ASDs might repeat actions over and over again. They might want to have routines where things stay the same so they know what to expect. They might have trouble if family routines change. For example, if a child is used to washing his or her face before dressing for bed, he or she might become very upset if asked to change the order and dress first and then wash.

Treatment & Medicines for Asthma

Monday, February 8th, 2010

This remedy is a close homoeopathic simile to asthma, especially to the spasmodic variety where the symptoms are great weight and anxiety about the chest; sudden wheezing, dyspnoea, threatening suffocation, aggravated by motion; the cough causes gagging and vomiting. The cough is constant, the chest seems full of phlegm, yet none is expectorated, and the extremities are covered with cold perspiration. Lobelia is a remedy which one usually classifies with Ipecac. It has the great oppression of the chest and a weak sensation in the chest which seems to come from the epigastrium, where there is a feeling of a lump; there is nausea, profuse salivation; the attack is preceded by a pricking sensation through the whole system. It is most useful in bronchial and septic asthmas. The breathing is exceedingly difficult, and is relieved by moving about. A pain extending around the forehead from one temple to other and a pain in the back at the last dorsal vertebra are also useful indications. Arsenicum is quite similar to Ipecac in asthma, and attacks coming on after midnight lead to the use of this remedy. With Ipecac the expiration is especially difficult; vomiting when it occurs is apt to relieve the attack.

As stated above, Arsenicum has some similarity to Ipecac, but the time of attacks is just after midnight. The patient has a great deal of anguish and restlessness; he cannot lie down for fear of suffocation. There is anxiety and general sweat, and if the patient drowses off he is awakened with burning pain and soreness in the chest. It is especially the remedy if the disease be chronic and the dyspnoea habitual and dry and the patient aged. Apis has a suffocative feeling, and the patient does not see how he can get another breath, and the Bromine patient breathes very deeply as it seems as if he could not get air enough into his lungs,while under Grindelia robusta the patient on falling asleep ceases to breathe and awakes with a start. Grindelia has been found clinically to benefit humid asthmas and acute catarrhal asthmas, and Halbert states that 5 or 10 drops of the tincture every hour during the paroxysmal state will greatly palliate. Probably in higher potencies it would act curatively for its symptomatology represents the typical paroxysmal features of this disease. It has a peculiar symptom, a fear of going to sleep on account of loss of breath which awakens him. Viscum album is also clinically recommended. It has weakness of the respiratory and stertorous breathing. The asthma of Arsenicum is accompanied by great debility and burning in the chest, and it follows Ipecac well,and is especially useful in anaemic persons. Baehr and Jousset place this remedy at the head of our list for asthma.